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PostPosted: 23 Mar 2021, 10:56 
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I read up regarding the collision between the SAA DC-4 and a SAAF Harvard 7464 on Saturday 30 June 1962.

Between a couple of old Newspapers and the book Fields of Air by James Byron it basically comes down to this.

The DC-4 have just passed over Louis Botha airport, heading north to a beacon near Umdloti and the to turn back and land. (The Blue Line)
The Harvard where busy descending with 360° turns.
The collided at the end of Edwin Sales Drive. (The red Circle)
The DC-4 continued its flight north with a missing rudder. The Pilot successfully did the turn and landed the aircraft.
Both the Harvard Pilots escaped and landed by Parachute, near one another. One being caught by an street light. The Small yellow circle.
Image

Now where it differs a bit is where the Harvard ended up, 95% of the sources say in a road near a bowling club (The Yellow circle), although one newspaper claims on the beach ?

Image

The reason for the collision have been attributed to miscommunication from the Louis Botha Control tower, one of the trafic controllers came in earlier for work and as luck would have it, one where busy with the DC-4 and the other one with the Harvard on different frequencies.

What did I get wrong ?


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PostPosted: 24 Mar 2021, 22:55 
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Hi Pepster,

My grandfather witnessed the collision. Just to confirm, even though it was reported by the one newspaper, the Harvard did not come down on the beach. It crashed where the Bowling Club is today. Below is and email (Verbatim) I sent to John "Jaws" at the South African Harvard Association on 25 February 2014 about the collision. In the email my I passed on the details of precisely where the Harvard came down as recalled by my dad.

Hi John

I hope you are well. Like most kids growing up in South Africa I had a very keen interest in anything SAAF, was a Pupe for a short time and completed my national service there '88 to '90.

My father always spoke of a Harvard that collided with a DC-4 and crashed near his house on the Bluff in Durban in the early 1960's. The history of Harvard 7464 ties up with what he has mentioned. I also asked if he was in the attached photo of the wreckage of 7464 which I found on the DC-4 Association of SA’s website at http://www.dc-4.co.za/43157.htm


Below is my dad’s email to me:

Hi James
Answers:
1) In a vacant (then not now) plot, corner of Old Mission and Wentworth roads (about 100 metres from our house). Diagonally opposite Grosvenor Girls High School (same intersection).
2) Could be – not enough definition to tell.

My dad, your grandfather, was watching the planes and saw the collision, also watched the two parachutes from the stricken Harvard, come down. One landed (in a tree) in Alden Road about 80 metres from our house and the other in Edwin Swales Drive (now Solomon Mahlangu Drive) near the Bluff Road intersection. Both pilot and trainee were unhurt.


The crash site, attached, is at (-29.921192, 31.002273) on Google Maps. As you will see it is on the landing approach to the old Louis Botha Airport.

As per the “AT-6 Harvard in South African Service” one of the pilots of 7464 was Lt P.B. Sinclair.

I hope this was of interest.

Kind Regards,

James


Below is the locations on Google as per my fathers quotes above:

Image

Harvard 7464:

Image

Wreckage photo:

Image

I hope this helps.

Best Regards
James


Last edited by jamesb557 on 25 Mar 2021, 00:39, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Mar 2021, 00:07 
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Hi Pepster,

To add: The reason the subject arose in 2014 is a very good friend mentioned that he flew in the DC-4 ZS-BMH Lebombo (C/N 43157) for one hour at Fairford on the 23rd July1998. This is the DC-4 that Harvard 7464 collided with.

Also, when I told him the story, Kitty Hawk had recently released a 1/32 scale model of the Harvard which he promptly built as 7464. I have posted a few photos in
SAAF Builds. http://www.saairforce.co.za/forum/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=10706

James


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PostPosted: 25 Mar 2021, 07:09 
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Great stuff, thanks Pepster and James.

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PostPosted: 25 Mar 2021, 16:26 
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Thanks James,

Some News Papers got the story wrong :roll:

Apperantly people in the rear of the Skymaster noticed something happening and for people in the front it was everything normal:

Here is an old Scope Article of the Sykmaster:



Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


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PostPosted: 25 Mar 2021, 20:56 
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I think I know which image people clicked on first :lol:

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PostPosted: 26 Mar 2021, 09:36 
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jamesb557 wrote:

Harvard 7464:

Image



Very special photo, somewhere I saw an article about a picture from a different angle. Still with Springbok roundels, and take a good look at the starboard wing. There is a Psychrometer mounted on it. (I think it was in an old Archimedes magazine)


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PostPosted: 26 Mar 2021, 10:23 
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Psychrometer = A hygrometer consisting of wet-bulb and dry-bulb thermometers, the difference in the two thermometer readings being used to determine atmospheric humidity.

(I had to look that one up)

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