The SAAF Forum

Discussion on the SAAF and other southern African air forces.
It is currently 17 Sep 2019, 21:07

All times are UTC + 2 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Silver Falcon crash 1993
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 01:20 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 09 May 2008, 12:45
Posts: 61
Location: Pretoria
hi guys,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9L61Bt-R4pU

came across this vid on avcom an was wondering if anyone knows the reason for the structural failure?

_________________
flying is easy, you just throw yourself at the ground and miss...


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 03:13 
Offline

Joined: 15 Feb 2010, 02:11
Posts: 473
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
As I recall the incident, Atlas Aircraft / Simera / Atlas aviation / Denel Aviation were responsible for fatigue tracking of the Impala since they were OEM and maintenance authority. They did not know that at some stage the newish wings on this particular Impala had been swapped for an oldish pair of wings. There was a wing main spar structural failure, which could probably have been predicted if fatigue tracking had been better.

The fatigue tracking procedures were improved after this accident.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 06:08 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 03 May 2005, 08:40
Posts: 3373
Location: Whangarei, New Zealand
I remember this incident well, very sad.

_________________
A plan is simply a basis for change.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 07:26 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2004, 14:33
Posts: 3040
I was at Lanseria that day of the crash,saw it as it happened..was hoping Charles Rudnick ejected safely,but remembering his parachute not opening enough..and saw him descend at a high rate into his aircraft's fireball..was not something I would like to see again.

The morning before the accident I had a preminition,it was about 8 am..I saw the one of the ground crew of the silver falcons sitting on the same wing that failed that morning..on the same aircraft..I thinking then to myself what if it should break off there in flight?

Right after that me and my sister thought we would go for a helicopter flip,she went first..the helicopter,bell jet ranger refused to start.I then said she must rather leave the flip.I though..this is a sign that something bad is going to happen...she did not fly that day,which was to be her first chopper flip,I said don't go up...Strange hey?

_________________
Yesterday is history.
Tomorrow is a mystery.
But today is a gift.
That's why it's called the present.
____________________________
Adrian Munro
http://www.weddingduo.co.za
https://www.facebook.com/Airfirephotography/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 08:20 
Offline

Joined: 10 Jul 2008, 14:55
Posts: 1171
Location: Stellenbosch
It is interesting how one gets those '6th sense' moments....

At the TFDC show when Dave Stock lost his life (RIP)... I recall them having a lucky draw to win a flight in the Lightning, and all of my friends were telling to enter (as it was my birthday)... and I strongly refused saying I would not fly in TC aircraft as I do not see how a sophisticated military fighter like a Lightning, can be maintained on a civi budget.


Needless to say, I got a very strong feeling of 'wrong!', when I saw the vapor trail behind the aircraft and thought 'hmm, that ISNT normal, has somebody reported it to the control tower???'.....

Sadly we all know the outcome.

_________________
When in doubt, use a hammer. The bigger the doubt, the bigger the hammer.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 11:28 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 29 Jun 2004, 17:19
Posts: 7562
Captain Charlie Rudnick of 83 JFS in 1989, taken before our flight. RIP.

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 12:55 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2004, 14:33
Posts: 3040
Charlie Rudnick had just broken away from the formation as #5 to do the solo routine. His first loop was almost complete when the RH wing broke off at the root. He ejected way out of the seats envelope – high ROD, too close to the ground. The fact that he got out is commendable as the wing snapped under around 6G and the rotation rate was very high. His chute was still streaming at ground impact. I spoke to various people that reached the scene and was told that he suffered massive trauma due impact with the trees and ground. I don’t think he died as a result of being sucked into the fireball, but rather due to hitting the trees/ground.

Via this site,some interesting ejection stories here
http://www.ejection-history.org.uk/aero ... obatic.htm

_________________
Yesterday is history.
Tomorrow is a mystery.
But today is a gift.
That's why it's called the present.
____________________________
Adrian Munro
http://www.weddingduo.co.za
https://www.facebook.com/Airfirephotography/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 22 Sep 2011, 17:32 
Offline

Joined: 26 Mar 2009, 16:12
Posts: 181
Airfire wrote:
I don’t think he died as a result of being sucked into the fireball, but rather due to hitting the trees/ground.


Agreed , I was there and saw the part of the wing that broke off falling to the ground , and watched the aircraft descending vertically while in a fast roll ,the pilot ejected perhaps slightly more or less than a second before the aircraft impacted with the ground while the aircraft was still more or less vertical with the ejection seats path of travel being very close to horizontal .


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 23 Sep 2011, 14:41 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 05 Aug 2005, 23:18
Posts: 330
Location: Unknown
I have read some information on that fatal crash, and the impact of the pilot+ejection seat was not into the fireball, it impacted in an open field and skidded along the ground for about 100m. The pilot separated from the seat about halfway and was found next to a fence. The impact with the ground was so hard that the ejection seat disintegrated.The deceased pilot was moving so fast along the ground that he had bent a steel dropper of a fenceline before coming to rest. Very sad accident, a brilliant pilot lost that day.

_________________
Fights On!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 11:40 
Offline

Joined: 08 Mar 2018, 11:29
Posts: 1
I was the last person who spoke to Captain Charlie, the last member of the public, minutes before he died on that fateful day in 1993.

On Saturday 2 October 1993 I took my two sons Guillaumé and Hartman, then 13 and 12 years old, to the air show at Lanseria. I grew up in Dunnottar where the flying school was, captain Pine Pienaar and Mannetjies Roux and all. I loved air shows.

Sometime during the show, my sons said: “Ons wil na die jets gaan kyk.” (“We want to go look at the jets”) We strolled over, low and behold; there was a Vampire jet that I had not seen for many years. One of the Impala jets had its step ladder up. Always eager to explore, my two sons were into the cockpit like a flash. It wasn’t long before the pilot arrived.

He said: “Askies, ek wil inklim.” (“Sorry, I want to get in.”)
I asked: “Gaan jy nou vlieg?” (”Are you gonna fly now?”)
He replied: “Ja, ons is volgende.” (“Yes, we are next.”)

That was it. That was my conversation with Captain Charlie, minutes before he crashed. I was the last civilian who spoke to him.

While my sons were getting out of the Impala, I could not take my eyes off the young pilot. He looked like an Olympic athlete. I got the impression that one could ask him to quickly run and go fetch a leave from a tree on top of the hill, and he’d come back smiling. The name tag on his chest read “Captain Charlie … something”. Later I learnt that his surname was Rudnick and that he was 34 years old. He had this crazy sort of overall on, which I was told was a pressure suit.

My two sons went and stood behind the Impala when it started up, a safe distance away; it blew them off their feet … the “giant hair dryer”.

We watched the air show by the Silver Falcons Aerobatic Team in awe. They were so fast, now here and then gone, like lightning. It was unbelievable, great, super, fantastic. Apparently Captain Charlie was the leader; he broke away and made a loop, while the other Impalas flew through the loop. And then, coming down to complete his loop, the one wing broke off. Just like that. He still had the presence of mind, and extremely fast reactions, to bail out, but he hit the ground before his parachute could open. His plane crashed close to a house.

The show went on as if nothing happened. The next item was refuelling a fighter plane in the air. The Boeing was already on its way from Zwartkop.

Inadvertently I thought, what if my two sons had pushed the wrong button while they were in the cockpit? Obviously there’s no “eject wing” button. It must have been something like metal fatigue that caused the wing to break off.

Rest in peace Captain Charlie, having met you, we shall never forget you.

Here is the facebook link to a video of the crash.
https://www.facebook.com/dirk.steyn.718 ... 553241378/
The link might not work here. My email address is wegdraai@vodamail.co.za I can email you the video.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 13:42 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 01 Oct 2004, 14:33
Posts: 3040
Welcome Beesboerkie,thank you for the story.

I was there too that day,saw his plane on the ground as the ground crew brought it out of the hangars the morning at the now freight apron at Lanseria,I ride past every day where Charles Rudnick died,no memorial,nothing,the women who's farm the plane crashed on made a killing out of the SAAF's for compensation what I heard,saw the entire crash that day,I left soon afterwards as it was too distressing just knew the pilot had passed away,no chance getting out there alive.

_________________
Yesterday is history.
Tomorrow is a mystery.
But today is a gift.
That's why it's called the present.
____________________________
Adrian Munro
http://www.weddingduo.co.za
https://www.facebook.com/Airfirephotography/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 08 Mar 2018, 15:19 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 29 Jun 2004, 17:19
Posts: 7562
Welcome beesboertjie.

I've fixed my photo above.

Incidentally, I met Charlie's wife Karen at a luncheon in 2015 and had a good chat.

_________________
How come every time my ship comes in, I'm at the airport?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 2 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 12 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group