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PostPosted: 27 Dec 2016, 11:37 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

An almost new year and a new aircraft type!

I had originally planned to do a Mirage III this month, but at the eleventh hour of my decision making process decided to rather opt for something savoury rather than 'hot'.

I thus introduce what may be my only new type for 2017 – an English Electric Canberra accident from 1972. Ideally, I would like to have introduced this type much sooner, but alas, only stumbled across my first 'Can' source info during my 2015 research trip. It’s hardly a long summary at 1.5 pages but the number of period images (ten) is completely out of proportion therewith and shows two different aircraft parts from multiple angles (just in case we didn't get it the first time around?) At least one is left in no doubt as to which part broke and how it broke! This aside, it’s a 'pleasant' incident with no injuries to anyone and no lasting damage to materiel.

The balance of the year should otherwise see all the traditional regular types represented: Harvard (twice), Super Frelon, Mirage III, Wasp, Alouette III (2017 thus correcting any rotary wing deficiencies that somehow crept in during 2016), Dakota, Impala, Sabre, Shackleton and Cessna 185. Of course nothing is set in stone and I could at any stage insert a 'surprise' or new aircraft type (there are a few lingering) simply to satisfy the taste for something different….

Next month's accident will be only my second involving the Super Frelon.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961: (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images); 01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -
01/06/2016: Cessna 185 723* crashed on 22/11/1963 during an operational low-level navigation training flight below
50ft AGL (5 pages text, one diagram and 8 period images); 01/05/2016: Shackleton 1722 landed nosewheel unlocked at AFS Langebaanweg on 07/07/1960 during a routine training flight launched from AFS Ysterplaat (2½ pages text and 5 period images); 01/04/2016: Sabre 357* crashed fatally within the grounds of AFS Waterkloof on 11/05/1966 whilst conducting visual smoke trials in front of a 1 Squadron flight commander and the technical officer (3½ pages text, 3 period images and 1 diagram);
01/03/2016: Impala 508 suffered a bird strike whilst in the circuit at Langebaanweg on 24/11/1969 (½ pages text and 1 period image);
01/02/2016: -


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
412 10/02/70;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;
watch this space!

De Havilland Vampire

212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
87 19/09/68*;

Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 115

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database below are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R35 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION.


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 Post subject: Super Frelon Incident
PostPosted: 29 Jan 2017, 11:30 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

What a coincidence that only the second Super Frelon accident I've considered is yet again serial 301.

This causation is unfortunately one which repeats itself on almost every aircraft type on more than one occasion and on higher performance aircraft has even claimed SAAF lives. The lesson here is clear and requires no additional emphasis – a preflight needs to be clinically thorough.

For the researcher, the benefits of doing multiple occurrences involving the same type were manifest in this case. For instance, when I did the first occurrence involving this serial, the manufacture date was given as only month and year, but was given in full during this subsequent official report. Every little bit helps. Thank you.

Unusually, there were no accompanying period images as the photo film was somehow damaged shortly following its taking.

Next month's accident will be that slightly delayed Mirage III one.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);
01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -
01/06/2016: Cessna 185 723* crashed on 22/11/1963 during an operational low-level navigation training flight below
50ft AGL (5 pages text, one diagram and 8 period images); 01/05/2016: Shackleton 1722 landed nosewheel unlocked at AFS Langebaanweg on 07/07/1960 during a routine training flight launched from AFS Ysterplaat (2½ pages text and 5 period images);
01/04/2016: Sabre 357* crashed fatally within the grounds of AFS Waterkloof on 11/05/1966 whilst conducting visual smoke trials in front of a 1 Squadron flight commander and the technical officer (3½ pages text, 3 period images and 1 diagram);
01/03/2016: Impala 508 suffered a bird strike whilst in the circuit at Langebaanweg on 24/11/1969 (½ pages text and 1 period image);



PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;
watch this space!

De Havilland Vampire

212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
87 19/09/68*;

Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 116

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database below are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R35 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 12 Mar 2017, 11:44 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

Some aircraft excite me no matter what the content of the accident I am about to consider and the Mirage III is one of many such types.

Of particular interest to me was the second occupant of this two seater who, despite this scary occurrence, went on to become a SAAF pilot and later served and died whilst flying on the Buccaneer.

This summary has all the basic ingredients of a 'nice' accident and requiring not too much investigation, thus limiting this summary's length.

Once again, the period images were most revealing in a number of different ways.

Next month's accident will be back to the opposite end of the performance spectrum with another Harvard release.

For those of you who have read this far, a little reward awaits! A free sample accident summary involving the Mirage III (excluding images, but including image captions) in 1969 is presented right at the end of this entry. Please scroll down.

As always, the purpose of this sample is not a token of my charity, but to give those unfamiliar my work, an indication of the detail gone into, the general format of presentation and the 'language' of accident speak. This one is meatier than most as it required considerable investigation on the part of investigators! Enjoy.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);
01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -
01/06/2016: Cessna 185 723* crashed on 22/11/1963 during an operational low-level navigation training flight below
50ft AGL (5 pages text, one diagram and 8 period images); 01/05/2016: Shackleton 1722 landed nosewheel unlocked at AFS Langebaanweg on 07/07/1960 during a routine training flight launched from AFS Ysterplaat (2½ pages text and 5 period images); 01/04/2016: Sabre 357* crashed fatally within the grounds of AFS Waterkloof on 11/05/1966 whilst conducting visual smoke trials in front of a 1 Squadron flight commander and the technical officer (3½ pages text, 3 period images and 1 diagram);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;
watch this space!

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
87 19/09/68*;

Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 117

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

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Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

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Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT SUMMARY compiled by Clinton Barnard; source: SAAF

Occurrence Date: 15 March 1969
Aircraft Involved: one Dassault Mirage IIIEZ (serial 821)
Aircrew & Aircraft Home Unit: 2 Squadron at AFB Waterkloof
Accident Root Cause: human error (faulty manufacturer procedures)
Aircraft Damage Classification: Category 3A
Total Human Involvement: 1
Total On-Board Human Involvement: 1
Total Human Attrition: 1 OK
Identity of Involved: pilot, 2/Lt Reynold Westerman Colyn (65543167R)

“Negative. Tiger 3 is bailing out!”
With these words, Second Lieutenant (2/Lt) RW Colyn from 2 Squadron South African Air Force (SAAF), Air Force Base (AFB) Waterkloof, made known his intentions to all listening out on channel 119.7, including his Flight
Commander, Major (Maj) JW Guyt. By so doing, he had the distinction of becoming the first SAAF pilot to eject from
a supersonic high performance aircraft over African soil. The resulting crash, on March 15, 1969, meant the complete loss of the Air Force's first Dassault Mirage III and also the first Mirage IIIEZ since the 'Supersonic
Samoosa' first commenced local operations in 1963. The ejection was completely successful and the pilot escaped
without injury.
The 20-year-old Second Lieutenant, who was not a flight instructor, had 727 total military flying hours on record,
168 hours of which were on Mirage IIIs, the latter further broken down into 19.25 hours dual and 148.35 hours as
aircraft captain. He had an instrument rating achieved on August 28, 1968 and had 78.0 hours total instrument flying experience (67.35 hours simulated and 10.25 hours actual flying) plus 56.25 hours on the Link Trainer. His last flight medical was taken on January 22, 1969 and his most recent assessment of flying proficiency was a high average grading achieved at 1 Squadron on June 10, 1968. He had no previous record of accidents due to his pilot error.
A flight of four Mirage IIIs was tasked to undertake a formation flypast at the opening ceremony for the SA Games
to be held at Bloemfontein on March 15, 1969. Maj Guyt was appointed as Tiger Leader in Tiger Formation and he
authorised himself and three other Mirage IIIs to undertake a bridging flight to Bloemfontein where refuelling was to
be carried out. An extensive pre-flight briefing was given by the Major to all members of Tiger Formation regarding
the initial leg from Waterkloof to Bloemfontein and again at Bloemfontein regarding the flypast itself and the
subsequent return to home Base. Although the exact model and serial breakdown of the three other Mirages was
unfortunately not revealed in the subsequent official Board of Inquiry report, it is at least confirmed that Tiger 3 was
Mirage IIIEZ serial 821.
Since only a limited groundcrew complement would be in attendance, each pilot was personally to supervise the
refuelling of his own aircraft at Bloemfontein. Following the flypast, the formation would vector directly for Waterkloof, it being determined beforehand that a minimum of 400 gallons of fuel would be required to reach Base safely.
After refuelling at Bloemfontein, Tiger Formation performed a stream take-off at 15H00. 2/Lt Colyn performed a
slam check prior to take-off and all engine indications were normal ie, the engine spool up time was 9 seconds, the
RPM was 100% and the jet pipe temperature (JPT) prior to brakes off, 700°C (1 292°F). The post combustion (see
#3 below) light up at brakes release was also normal taking from 1 to 2 seconds, RPM fluctuating from 96 to 101%
and JPT between 700 and 720°C (1 328°F).
During the flypast, the RPM range covered was from 90 to 98%, following which the formation performed a dry
climb (ie, without the benefit of afterburner) to 21,000 ft (6 402 m) after having set course at 15H15 with 620 gallons
of fuel aboard and well above the minimum required for their stated objective. At the top of the climb and whilst flying in a loose, comfortable finger four formation, the Tigers settled down to a 95% RPM cruise back to Waterkloof.
At around 15H26 in the vicinity of Kroonstad, Jan Smuts Flight Information Control (a reference to the air traffic
control facility at Jan Smuts International Airport, now OR Tambo International Airport) identified the formation
positively on radar 100 miles (160 km) away from Jan Smuts. Weather at this time was partly cloudy, but gradually
worsening as the formation approached the Witwatersrand.
About 10 minutes after the top of the climb and in the vicinity of Koppies, 2/Lt Colyn noticed that his Mirage was
dropping back from the rest of the formation. He opened up to 100% RPM (full power without resorting to
afterburner) and was then just able to maintain station with the rest of the formation, who he assumed were still
cruising at 95% RPM. After holding his position at 100% RPM for about half a minute, his aircraft again began to fall
back. At this stage the Second Lieutenant believed that the rest of the formation had lit post combustion (afterburner) and that he had somehow missed the radio call, so he responded similarly and noticed that the light up, although still within limits, took longer than normal for the altitude at which they were flying, although the RPM fluctuation was as before. He noticed an abnormal forward surge on light up, but all engine indications were normal and he did not give the matter a second thought. At full afterburner, he was able to catch up with the rest of the formation.
After catching up, he throttled back to minimum afterburner and managed to hold station with the rest of the
formation for about 15 seconds, whereupon the aircraft again began to fall behind. He cut post combustion and
noticed that the maximum obtainable RPM at dry thrust setting was only 98% rather than the normal 100%. Checking the JPT, he found it had dropped to 450°C (842°F), which was below normal. At about 15H30, the Second Lieutenant informed Maj Guyt about these developments, although the Major did not at that stage consider the situation to be serious. The Major did, however, progressively reduce power to help the straggler catch up, but
despite Tiger Lead subsequently only flying at 90% RPM, Tiger 3 was unable to make any impression on closing the gap. At this stage Tiger 3 had fallen so far behind Tiger Lead that he was no longer in sight.
Tiger Lead informed Jan Smuts Control that one of the formation aircraft had engine problems and that he was
handing the crippled fighter over to them for a landing at Jan Smuts on account of the emergency situation now
prevailing. His reasons for doing this were manifold: The formation had already been under positive radar control for
a significant period of time and that in controlled airspace. Secondly, weather conditions were most unfavourable for
visual flight rules, with 6 to 7/8ths cumulus clouds with a well defined base of 9,000 ft (2 744 m) and estimated tops
at 18,000 ft (5 488 m). The flight had originally been authorised for instrument flight rules conditions which now
prevailed. Visibility was 5 to 7 miles (8 to 11 km) and he had lost visual sighting of Tiger 3. With Control continuing to issue instructions for a ground controlled approach for landing on Runway 030 at Smuts, Tiger Lead was satisfied
that the situation was under control. Shortly thereafter, Control came back to the formation to instruct them to turn on to 065°Magnetic to clear the air corridor for Springbok 315, a Boeing 727 out of Jan Smuts and coming initially for Flight Level 140 via Mike Tango Beacon for Kimberley. Having lost final sight of Tiger Formation, the struggling Tiger 3 turned to 065°M.
Following the turn, Tiger 3's speed had dropped to 275 kts (508 km/h, 316 mph) and in order to maintain the speed for optimum range - 280 kts (517 km/h, 321 mph) – 2/Lt Colyn was forced to start descending. In order to reduce the drag component and on suggestion from Major Guyt, the pilot jettisoned his drop tanks. The RPM was now between 95 and 97%. It was at this point that the Major determined that the developing situation had now become serious.
Shortly after his handover to Jan Smuts Control, the pilot asked them for a steer and was told to “maintain your
heading.” He now entered cloud at about 16,500 ft (5 030 m) and suddenly realised that he had drifted off his
intended heading of 065°M to 035°M, prompting him to again request a heading from Control. “Maintain your
heading,” was their response again. He then asked them to monitor his height against distance and Control relayed
his distance from Smuts at various intervals and once or twice relayed what his height should have been. At 15H36
Flight Information Control handed Mirage 821 over to Approach Control on channel 119.7.
Upon reaching an altitude of 11,000 ft (3 354 m) he elected to carry out the energy procedures for what he
believed was the cause for his loss of power – RPM freezing. He activated the energy regulator and throttled back to check whether the RPM would fall, but it did not. It simply remained at 89% at 13,000 ft (3 963 m) and descending about 18 miles (29 km) from touchdown. Going into full dry power was only met by the RPM relentlessly continuing to drop. Note that the Pilot's Handling Notes stated specifically that afterburner was not to be engaged below 100% RPM and for this reason alone, 2/Lt Colyn refrained from doing so.
At one stage Approach announced that the Mirage's height should be 7,500 ft (2 287 m), the pilot informing them
that he was well above that height and that he intended to maintain his present rate of descent. Shortly thereafter, he broke cloud at 9,000 ft with RPM at 88% and pinpointed himself over a built up area to the west of Baragwanath.
Turning towards Baragwanath, the pilot informed Approach of his position and they instructed him to turn on to 090°
M, which the pilot was already steering at that time. The pilot selected approach thrust control in an effort to obtain
more power, but this was unresponsive. Tiger 3 now asked Tiger Lead as to whether he should attempt a forced
landing at Baragwanath? Tiger Lead responded that the Second Lieutenant should use his own discretion on this
decision, whereupon 2/Lt Colyn decided that a forced landing at this location would be extremely risky. With RPM
having dropped to 86%, the pilot immediately turned through a further 90° to make for an open field. These two
turns, the first onto 090°M towards Baragwanath and then the second towards the open field, resulted in a speed
sacrifice from 270 kts (498 km/h, 309 mph) to 190 kts (351 km/h, 218 mph). With the aircraft clearly not now going to be able to make the runway at Jan Smuts and with available options rapidly evaporating, 2/Lt Colyn ejected at 15H41 from about 300 ft (91 m) AGL.
The pilot of a civilian aircraft reported only moments later that he had observed an aircraft accident 2 miles (3.2
km) south of Baragwanath. Maj Guyt broke away from the formation and went to investigate the accident. Having
confirmed the accident, he informed Jan Smuts Control before returning to Waterkloof.
Mirage 821 impacted open ground on the farm Goudkoppies. No damage was caused to civilian property and no
civil claims were instituted against the South African Department of Defence, despite R 1 071 249.32 damage having been caused to the aircraft, of which nothing of value was deemed salvageable for possible future reuse. The single SNECMA ATAR 09C4 turbojet engine (number 9647) had suffered similarly.
Until clarity could be obtained as to the exact cause of the aircraft accident, the Air Force took the precautionary
decision to ground its entire Mirage III fleet indefinitely.
AFB Waterkloof was administered under Tactical Group. It was at Waterkloof that the three member Board of
Inquiry, under the presidency of Maj JM Crafford, a general duties pilot presently on assignment to the SAAF
College, was assembled on March 17, 1969, by order of Brigadier JN Robbs, the Officer Commanding Tactical
Group.
Since initial investigations pointed to fuel starvation as a possible cause of the accident, initial effort was directed
towards the aircraft's fuel system.
The loss of thrust in Mirage 821, followed rapidly by a decrease in RPM indicated the following possible
occurrences to the Board: (1) Opening of the engine exhaust nozzle flaps with the consequent loss of thrust as
evidenced by low JPT and/or; (2) Reduced fuel flow causing a drop in RPM. These initial symptoms pointed towards the following possible malfunctions: (1) Loss of P2 pressure in the fuel regulator causing the dozer to partially close and reduce fuel flow; or (2) Loss of high pressure oil pressure firstly causing the opening of the nozzle flaps and secondly affecting the fuel regulator to reduce fuel flow and/or; (3) Fuel starvation caused by a defective main fuel pump and/or insufficient fuel supply to the main fuel pump caused by a leaking fuel line or blocked fuel filter.
In the case of the loss of P2 pressure, the subsequent fuel flow would be accompanied by rapid and extensive
fluctuations in RPM, which was not the case in this accident. Although investigation revealed a leak in the P2 filter
past the copper washer, only caused by faulty oil pressure, the fact is that the aircraft had flown many hours in that
condition without suffering malfunction and it was thus concluded by the Board that this leak was too small to be of
any significance and did not cause or contribute to the emergency.
To prove with any certainty that high pressure (HP) oil failure occurred, is most problematic. In the event of HP oil
failure, the oil warning light and the warning horn should warn the pilot, except where the oil pressure switch is
defective. The oil warning switch could not be found amongst the wreckage debris and HP oil failure as a possible
cause was only discarded after inspection of the HP fuel pump and main fuel filter revealed different evidence of fuel starvation.
The HP fuel pump revealed evidence of severe pump cavitation#1 beyond acceptable limits – the direct result of
fuel starvation caused by an insufficient supply of fuel at the low pressure (LP) end of the main fuel pump. This in
turn, could result from a defective fuel booster pump or from blockage in the fuel supply system. There is no bypass
to the main fuel filter, and if blocked, it will result in fuel starvation.
Although pilot evidence suggested that one fuel booster pump might have malfunctioned, the output of the second
pump would have been adequate for continued operation. According to the pilot, the cockpit LP warning light did not
indicate any malfunction. According to the Pilot's Handling Notes, at 100% RPM, Mach 0.96 can be maintained at
20,000 ft (6 098 m) with both booster pumps out of action.
Two days following the accident, Maj Crafford accompanied the SNECMA technical representative to Atlas Aircraft Corporation, Mr J Ohnimus, to the crash scene of Mirage 821. They found the main fuel filter. Although the filter normally holds from 29 to 32 copper and/or stainless steel filter elements, only 25 elements were still attached to the main fuel filter found at the scene, the others having been strewn about the scene or damaged. The filter was taken by them to Atlas for investigation. Mr Ohnimus extracted ten elements (those in fairly good condition) and
despatched them by air to SNECMA in France for separate analysis, the balance of the filter elements remaining at
Atlas for further local analysis.
On March 27, 1969, a reply from France was received indicating that a pressure test of the fuel pump inlet by
comparison with the outlet, revealed a large discrepancy, and thus an almost complete clogging of the fuel filter
elements contained therein. A flow test confirmed the clogging of the filter elements. Furthermore, SNECMA advised that, in order to lift the present aircraft grounding, the following preliminary steps, among others, be taken on all ATAR engines: (1) Check the porousness of the fuel filter elements and when in doubt, change them; (2) Where engine acceleration exceeds 18 seconds, replace the fuel pump and check it for internal condition; (3) Where evidence of fuel pump cavitation was found, replace the main fuel regulator.
Four filter elements were handed to the laboratory for microscopic analysis, which revealed them to be 99%
blocked with a white crystalline material impregnated in between the fine mesh making up the filter elements. This
prompted the subsequent analysis of other Mirage fuel filters with specimens of Mirage 821's filter elements and five other aircrafts' being sent to the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) for detailed chemical analysis. This
revealed that the material comprised of particles of silicone, calcium, magnesium and aluminium, or in layman's
terms, common dust!
A Flight Commander of 2 Squadron, Maj AH Repsold, with about 400 hours collectively on the Mirage IIIC and IIIE
models, was instructed by the president of the BOI, to perform various flight tests on the use and effects of approach thrust control on the Mirage. Approach thrust control is used to maintain constant airspeed at a fixed throttle setting during the landing approach. The approach thrust controls the airspeed by varying the JPT by either closing or opening the engine exhaust nozzle flaps. Normally, the approach thrust is engaged at 89-90% RPM and should maintain the airspeed at 185 kts (342 km/h, 212 mph) give or take 5 kts (9 km/h, 6 mph). It should also maintain this speed while descending at up to 1,200 ft/min (366 m/min) or ascending at up to 800 ft/min (244 m/min).
On April 2, 1969, he performed the test. Starting at 7,500 ft (2 287 m) with 85% power and with approach thrust
selected, the Mirage would not maintain either height or speed and the nozzle flaps failed to come into operation.
The Major abandoned this test at 170 kts ( 314 km/h, 195 mph) and JPT of 360°C (680°F). A second test was then
carried out at the same altitude but at 88% RPM and the aircraft maintained a speed of 170 kts at a 0 ft/min rate of
climb. A final test was performed at 9,000 ft (2 744 m) at 90% power and the aircraft climbed at 300 ft/min (91
m/min) at 182 kts (336 km/h, 209 mph) and a JPT of 500°C (932°F).
What effect would fuel starvation have on the operation of the exhaust nozzle flaps? If fuel starvation was at the
root of the emergency, this explained the probable opening of the nozzle flaps. In the event of fuel starvation, the
main fuel regulator, in an attempt to harmonise engine RPM with throttle position, reverses the flow of HP oil and
opens the nozzle flaps in order to ease the work on the turbine air driving the compressor.
At the time of the accident, Minor Inspections on Mirage aircraft were carried out by Atlas at its Engine Servicing
Section every 150 flying hours and Intermediate Inspections at 2 Squadron every 75 hours. During the Atlas
inspection, the fuel filter was cleaned and inspected according to laid down instructions in the engine manufacturer's
Maintenance Manual which stated: “Examine the filter element minutely and check the degree of fouling. Examine
sediment remaining in the housing. With a long haired brush and clean kerosene, first clean and then blow dry
compressed air on to the filter unit, filter cover, filter housing, stops and the circlip. Clean the inside of the filter
housing using a very clean lint-free cloth. Replace the fuel filter.” All inspections were visual and any damaged or
otherwise unsuitable filter elements were replaced with new ones. It therefore occasionally occurred that new filter
elements were fitted alongside used elements within the same fuel filter. Since both stainless steel and copper filter
elements existed, it was not unusual for both types to be mixed within the same filter.
Because of a lack of facilities at 2 Squadron, filter elements were always replaced with new ones during
inspections and not cleaned and reused as was the practice at Atlas.
At the time of the accident, ATAR engine number 9647 had 208.25 total operating hours since new and had first
been fitted as new into Mirage 821 on April 6, 1968. It was determined by the Board that Mirage 821's engine
underwent an Intermediate Inspection at 2 Squadron at 73.50 hours during September 1966, followed by a Minor
Inspection at Atlas at 155.50 hours during April 1968. It was during the latter inspection that the last fuel filter service had taken place.
The Board then decided to perform a test in order to ascertain the effectiveness of the filter cleaning process as
used at Atlas. A severely blocked filter element was first microscopically inspected by the Board and then handed
over for cleaning and inspection. This element was impregnated with the same kind of white dust material as found
in the fuel pump filter of Mirage 821.
Following cleaning and inspection by Atlas, the Board again subjected the filter element to microscopic inspection.
With the naked eye, the element appeared to be clean, but under the scrutiny of the microscope, the folly of the
cleaning process was exposed since the cleaning had clearly had little effect. While superficial dirt had been
removed, very little of the impregnated material had been eliminated. The element was so blocked that when held
against the light, no light penetrated. Normally, when viewing a clean or partially blocked filter element against the
light, the evenly spaced flow holes inside the element could be clearly seen through the fine wire mesh. Evidently,
the cleaning process as laid down by SNECMA and faithfully carried out by Atlas, was both ineffective and
inadequate. The Board thus found SNECMA indirectly responsible for the accident by laying down a method of filter
cleaning which, unbeknown to them, was inadequate for the type of residue, namely dust, found in the fuel filter of
Mirage 821.
These results prompted the Board to examine the Workpack and Inspection Log of Mirage 821 to ascertain
whether its previous inspection (a Minor) had been carried out at Atlas and what action was taken as regards the
main fuel filter. The Log indicated that there was no evidence that any of the fuel filter elements had been replaced
with new ones, leading the Board to conclude that the same elements must therefore have been replaced back into
the filter after their 'cleaning'.
It was thus reasonable for the Board to deduce that the same filter elements had served a period of 213.50 hours
(total airframe hours at the time of the accident) minus the 73.50 hours (when the last new filter elements were fitted
at 2 Squadron) = 140 hours without proper cleaning ie, almost double the laid down period of 75 hours which is the
normal cycle between inspections and also the life cycle of a particular filter element. The filter had become so
clogged during the second period of 75 hours as to prevent adequate passage of fuel for normal engine operation.
The subsequent fuel starvation caused fuel pump cavitation, which only aggravated an already serious situation, and led to the accident.
In order to substantiate the claims made above regarding the filter of Mirage 821, the filters of 21 other SAAF
Mirages were removed and subjected to microscopic examination. Some of these filter elements were found to be
severely blocked with the same kind of fine dust found in the filter of Mirage 821. Other elements ranged from
moderately blocked to clear. The Board then inspected the Log Books of these aircraft to ascertain the hours flown
since their last filter change and where and when the filter change had taken place. This revealed that the aircraft
with the most severely clogged filters, Mirages 804, 820 and 830, had all been serviced by Atlas. However, there
were some aircraft previously serviced by 2 Squadron, which had flown for a long period since filter change that also showed severe blocking of some filter elements, but not right through all the elements, as in the cases mentioned above.
While this was not a fireproof test, it did indicate two aspects of the problem: Firstly, that the conclusions made
about the inadequate cleaning process of filter elements had some validity and secondly, that the fuel used in Mirage aircraft was not as pure as was desirable. This prompted the Board to initiate a fuel investigation.
In 1969, aircraft fuel destined for AFB Waterkloof first arrived at Verwoerdburg Station in South African Railways
fuel tank cars, from where it was pumped through a 100 mesh wire filter to the main bulk installation at Waterkloof.
There, it passed through a 5-micron#2 filter into the main underground bulk fuel storage tanks. The 5-micron filter
was replaced 'on condition', whenever a back pressure of 10 psi was observed.
Before using newly arrived fuel, it was allowed to stand undisturbed for 24 hours to allow all more dense impurities
(both solid and chemical) to sink to the bottom. Water was drained off at weekly intervals, but tanks in active
operation were drained daily. Fuel was then pumped from the tanks through a 100 mesh wire filter to a blending unit, which added an anti-icing additive in the ratio 1 to 1 000. From here, it passed to a water trap and a 100 mesh filter and then via a 5-micron stream filter to the main hydrant refuelling points at the various squadrons. From here,
aircraft were refuelled by dispenser carts which had a 5-micron filter and the carts also had the provision for the daily drainage of both water and sediment.
It was possible for impurities to have entered the main underground tanks during dipping, but this would eventually have settled to the bottom of the tank. Fuel housed in the lowest levels of the tank was not likely to have ever been pumped out into the main hydrant on account of the fuel suction pipe being elevated about 12 inches from the bottom of the tank. Any impurities that remained in suspension, however, would have been trapped by the filters.
During 1969, aircraft at Waterkloof were refuelled by dispensing carts and less frequently, by bowsers. During
refuelling, if the refuelling nozzles were not kept covered or properly cleaned before use, ground and/or airborne dust could easily enter the nozzle mouth and get flushed into the aircraft fuel tanks. This applied equally to both dispenser carts and bowsers.
At 2 Squadron specifically, refuelling in the late 1960s was achieved using bowsers and three dispensing carts
which had been in use since November 1968. Construction, in close proximity to 2 Squadron for in excess of a year,
had included the sawing of concrete blocks for the laying of fuel pipes. This generated considerable airborne dust,
which could easily penetrate aircraft fuel tanks during refuelling, also with the mounting and removal of long range
external fuel tanks beneath the Mirages' wings.
At 2 Squadron the fuel dispensing pipes were heavy, cumbersome structures, making it difficult for ground
personnel doing refuelling, to manhandle them whilst simultaneously climbing on to the Mirage's wing. The result was that these pipes inevitably fell to the ground during manhandling, thereby causing damage to the dispenser nozzle.
This unenviable situation arose from there being insufficient ground crew available during refuelling compared to the ideal.
It was one of the tasks of the Quality Control Officer at Waterkloof to routinely visually check the fuel bowsers for
serviceability. During his last inspection of refuelling equipment at 2 Squadron, he found the six dispensing nozzles
on the three refuelling carts in a poor physical state, being damaged to such an extent that some nozzle caps would
not fit, while other caps were missing altogether! The last inspection of the fuel bowsers had found them in
reasonable condition with all the nozzle caps present and fitting correctly.
Nine fuel samples were drawn from various sources and sent to the SABS for particle analysis. The samples were
drawn as follows: Samples 2 and 6 from the main bulk storage tanks at Waterkloof; Samples 1 and 3 from the fuel
dispenser carts at 2 Squadron, one at the sump and the other at the nozzle; Samples 5, 7, 8 and 9 from the drop
tanks and main fuel tanks of Mirages refuelled at Waterkloof and; Sample 4 from the drop tanks of Mirage serial 820, refuelled at AFB Bloemspruit on the day of the accident.
The SABS tests revealed a marked variation in the particle content ranging from 0.2 g and 0.4 g/100 gallons in the bulk storage tanks, to 2.6 g/100 gallons at the dispenser. The aircraft tanks revealed impurities ranging between 0.6 g and 1.1 g/100 gallons. The Bloemfontein fuel sample, No. 4, was relatively clear. An alarming factor was not the actual quantity, but rather the size of these impurities (± 40% of the particles being bigger than 50 micron).
The particle content of 0.2 and 0.4 g/100 gallons in the bulk fuel as opposed to 2.6 g/100 gallons in the dispenser
sump, indicated that impurities entered the fuel at some stage in between. The only likely place for this to have
occurred was at the coupling unit connecting the dispenser to the fuel point. However, this was not considered
serious given that the fuel was filtered in the dispenser before entering the aircraft. It therefore did not explain the
higher particle content in the aircraft tanks and this increase must thus have taken place between the dispenser filter and the aircraft tank. On average, aircraft tank samples contained almost three times the number of impurities as the bulk fuel samples. The high particle content of 1.3 g/100 gallons in the fuel dispenser nozzle sample was most likely also due to a dusty nozzle opening.
It needs to be stated that the result of the fuel sample analysis can merely be used to indicate a tendency and
cannot be used to reflect a true solution. All the fuel samples were drawn from the bottom (dirtiest) location of the
tanks, including one of the main bulk samples. It thus does not follow that the impurities found were indicative of the
average impurities in the given mass when the sample was taken. This is probably much lower than that figure.
However, the values found may serve to indicate the amount of impurities that may build up in an aircraft filter over a given period.
Mirage 820's fuel was analysed for particle size and content and found to be 1.1 g/100 gallons. If, for example, the
average impurities in the tanks was only ½ the given amount, say 0.55 g/100 gallons, the amount accumulated over
the given period would thus be as follows: From the SABS report, 67% of the particles were larger than 25 micron
and 40% were bigger than 50 micron. Given a filter gauge of 40 micron, it is evident that about 50% of the particles
will remain behind in the filter, thus:
particle content = 0.55 g/100 gallons
average fuel flow through the filter at normal operation = 600 gallons/hr (100 gallons/10 min)
particles larger than 40 micron will be about: 50% x 0.55 = 0.27g/10 min (1.62 g/hr) and 121.5 g/75 hrs
since 450 g = 1 lb therefore 121.5 divided by 450 equates to more than 0.25 lbs ie, with the given average impurities, more than 0.25 lbs of dust may accumulate in a filter over a 75 hour operating cycle. This is an appreciable amount when taking the filter size into account and it further stresses the need for careful fuel handling.
The Board found that, if properly adhered to, the existing regulations as regards fuel handling and management,
were adequate to ensure that only pure fuel entered the aircraft tanks. On the other hand, it was understood that
personnel shortages would inevitably open the door to irregularities creeping in, however inexcusable.
The Board had reason to believe that impurities in the fuel was probably a contributory factor in the accident and
that this was probably due to inadequate care during refuelling. It was not possible to accord direct responsibility in
this matter since the timescale of dust accumulation was not known. Although the refuelling nozzles reflected a lack
of supervision by Squadron technical personnel, there was no evidence to prove that the nozzles were the main
carriers of the impurities. Neither was there proof that the fuel tanks of Mirage 821 contained a similar percentage of
impurities to the other aircraft from which samples were drawn. This was strictly a matter for speculation. There was
no evidence of how effectively refuelling had been carried out at refuelling stops other than at Waterkloof.
Jan Smuts Control clearly failed to positively identify Tiger 3 and passed him instructions on the strength of the
position of the rest of the formation. Mr BL Tomkins, the duty Flight Information Controller at Jan Smuts, stated in his evidence that the formation maintained one blip on the radar screen from Welkom to abeam Mike Tango Beacon and that even after Tiger 3 had reported that he had lost visual sighting of both Tiger Lead and the rest of the formation, there was still only one blip on the screen. He assumed that the separation was vertical and not lateral. He was using a 150 mile (242 km) scale with a 25 mile (40 km) ring marker.
The duty approach controller at Jan Smuts at the time of the accident, Mr TO Witford, was similarly unaware that
Tiger 3 was not with the rest of the formation. He had had a positive indication on radar of Tiger formation from about 35 miles (56 km) out and there was no indication of a straggler ie, only one blip visible. For this very reason, when he had an indication of a blip veering off towards Smuts and he also had the information of Tiger 3 directing towards Smuts, he assumed that this blip was Tiger 3. Had he been informed that Tiger 3 was not in the formation, he would not have assumed that this blip was Tiger 3 and would have endeavoured to identify him positively. Furthermore, Mr Witford had been informed about Tiger 3's engine problems, but not that Tiger 3 was unable to maintain altitude.
Under the present circumstances, it would have made no difference to the outcome had Tiger 3 been directly
guided towards Smuts. From the approximate position from where Smuts started to control Tiger 3, the distance to
Smuts was about 8-10 miles (13-16 km) further than Baragwanath Airfield. In fact, the fact the Tiger 3 was not
identified was a blessing in disguise since, had he been directed to Smuts, the aircraft might very well likely have
crashed into heavily populated areas.
The question is raised as to whether afterburner would have kept 2/Lt Colyn going had he chosen to keep it in
operation. It is conceivable that it might have worked for a while, but since RPM was dropping, the afterburner would have cut out automatically between 95% and 100% power. Relighting post combustion at an RPM below 98% had no chance of success.
Had the pilot jettisoned his drop tanks earlier rather than only at 11,000 ft (3 354 m), he might have had a good
chance of reaching Smuts. However, during the initial stages of his emergency, he had reason to believe that the
situation was not too serious and that he would be getting in to Smuts. Considering his experience and the fact that
he was under positive control from Smuts, it is not surprising that he held on to his tanks for such a long time.
It can be argued that the pilot, after having selected approach thrust, should have allowed his speed to decrease
below 185 kts (342 km/h, 212 mph) to ascertain whether the approach thrust was working. However, at this stage, he only had 85% power and it is highly unlikely that approach thrust would have allowed level flight at that RPM and
whether the RPM would have remained at 85% if indeed approach thrust did work.
The Board considered that the pilot made a wise decision to eject and not to perform a forced landing at
Baragwanath. The runway at this location was only about 4,500 ft (1 372 m) in length and considering the
surrounding area, it was felt that a forced landing with a Mirage on that airfield would have had tragic results.
The Board commended the pilot for having carried out the correct procedure under the circumstances and by
guiding his aircraft away from built-up areas and staying with the aircraft until the last possible moment to ensure that it fell generally where it had been directed.
Recommendations put forth by the Board included: (a) Main filter elements of all Mirages be replaced with new
elements or be cleaned in accordance with the method accepted by Maintenance Group; (b) Maintenance Group
arrange for the removal and inspection of two Mirage fuel filters at 37.5 hrs filter life, in order to ascertain the rate of
filter blockage. Appropriate action could then be taken as regards existing fuel filter life and fuel handling
requirements; ( c) Steps be taken to improve fuel handling precautions at 2 Squadron and that the importance of
proper fuel handling be stressed at all units where Mirages are refuelled and; (d) In the event of a similar emergency developing in the future and depending upon the particular scenario, that pilots take the following action: (1) If fuel allows, try to obtain post combustion light up and maintain this for as long as possible to try to regain base; (2) If unable to maintain altitude and not within reach of base, jettison drop tanks as soon as possible and proceed at optimum gliding speed; (3) At 10,000 ft (3 049 m) select the emergency fuel regulator as laid down in the Pilots Notes; (4) If emergency fuel has no effect, immediately select approach thrust according to the Pilot's Notes and reduce speed to just below 180 kts (332 km/h, 206 mph) to ascertain whether approach thrust is operative and; (5) If approach thrust is inoperative and altitude cannot be maintained, turn towards an open area and eject.
There was no reason to doubt any witness credibility.
On May 23, 1969, AFS Waterkloof Officer Commanding, Colonel Freeman, remarked that old nozzles on refuelling units on the Squadron had been replaced with new ones and new dust caps; that lighter fuel delivery hoses had been demanded for ease of handling; that garages for the refuelling units were being swept daily and washed regularly and finally that personnel had been briefed on the correct usage of the refuelling equipment.
On May 30, 1969 Colonel HOM Odendaal, acting on behalf of the OC Tactical Group, remarked that the symptoms prevailing at the time that the pilot first noticed a loss of power ie, 98% power and 450°C JPT, could also suggest a possible malfunction of the fuel regulator or parts thereof, but definite proof was not possible to establish given that this component was destroyed in the crash.
The SAAF's Air Staff Aircraft Accident Board, then under the chairmanship of Brigadier S van Breda Theron,
agreed with the findings of the Board and the comments of the Group Commander's representative.
The primary cause was thus the loss of power due to fuel starvation caused by a severely blocked main fuel filter.
The accident was classified as an avoidable major flying accident with nobody held directly responsible and no
disciplinary action to be taken against anyone.
Contributory factors, besides those already mentioned, included: (1) HP fuel pump cavitation due to fuel starvation; (2) Incorrect appreciation of the seriousness of the situation on the part of Maj Guyt and 2/Lt Colyn, who were thus indirectly to blame since no Mayday was announced leading to; (3) the air traffic controllers not being made aware of the severity of the developing situation.
In a signal from Maintenance Group to the Chief of the Air Force (CAF) dated May 1969, it was stated that a
servicing instruction had been issued covering the fitting of new main fuel pump filter elements every 75 hours
inspection rather than cleaned elements. The Group recommended that the Mirage grounding be lifted. In a further
signal from the CAF to Tactical Group also in May 1969, “Mirages may resume flying. Pilots to watch meticulously for any signs of loss of power.”
Sadly, the evidence of the pilot literally stopped in midair, with no evidence regarding this historic first ejection
being forthcoming. Information such as ejection altitude, speed, time, loads experienced etc, while having no bearing on the cause of the accident, are an integral part of any occurrence and would have been of great value to the SAAF as a whole and 2 Squadron in particular, as the OC AFS Watekloof did not fail to point out in his remarks on the BOI report.
Mirage 821 had been taken on 2 Squadron strength when allotted from 15 Air Depot (AD) to Waterkloof on July 8,
1965. Its first allotment thereafter was to Maintenance Group Detachment 5 on November 3, 1967. It was while
undergoing maintenance there during the next seven months that the seeds for its ultimate demise were first sown,
before being re-allotted from 12 Air Depot (as Detachment 5 had been renamed about January 1, 1968) back to 2
Squadron on June 5, 1968. It was struck off 2 Squadron strength as having been written off when allotted from
Waterkloof to 15AD on March 17, 1969.

#1 cavitation – If the pressure at any point inside a pump drops below the vapour pressure corresponding to the
temperature of the liquid being pumped, the liquid will vapourise and form cavities of vapour. The vapour bubbles are carried along with the stream until a region of higher pressure is reached when they collapse/implode with a
tremendous shock to the adjacent pump walls. This phenomenon is termed 'cavitation'. The sudden in-rush of liquid
into the cavity created by the collapsed vapour bubbles causes mechanical destruction, sometimes apparent as a
boring action, which might be called erosion. Additional destruction of the metal results from corrosion caused by the chemical reaction between the gases and the metal body. Another undesirable feature is the accompanying noise, varying in different units from a low rumbling, to loud knocks and resultant heavy vibration of the unit. The energy required to accelerate the water to the higher velocity in suddenly filling the hollow spaces is a loss and cavitation will thus be accompanied by a reduced efficiency. Water at 21°C (70°F) increases in volume about 54 000 times when vapourised. It is thus not surprising that pumps operating with cavitation also show a reduction in capacity. Cavitation normally occurs in the vane inlet portion of the pump impellor, on both the vanes and the sidewalls. Erosion and wear due to cavitation will not occur at the point of lowest pressure where the gas pockets are formed, but further upstream at the point where the implosion occurs.

#2 micron – refers to particle size. Note that 25 micron = 0.001 inches
#3 post combustion (French)=afterburner (American)=reheat (British)=thrust augmentation

Image Captions & Credits (all SAAF via Author):

Image 1: Aerial view of the accident scene seen as the disturbed area between the two drawn lines.
Image 2: The initial impact point of Mirage 821.
Image 3: Fuel filter elements (assembled).
Image 4: A single fuel filter element.
Image 5: Residue of impurities remaining once the filter gauze had been dissolved in nitric acid.
Image 6 and 7: Damaged fuel dispenser nozzles.

All text Copyright © Clinton Barnard


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PostPosted: 02 Apr 2017, 12:04 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

Harvard fans can stand closer for this month's presentation is for them.

This is the third occurrence of this causation in the few Harvard occurrences that I have done and this is simply one aircraft type over less than one and a half year calender period! One wonders what the statistics would be for the entire WWII period for each prop driven type? These would make interesting, yet sobering stats.

This accident illustrates decisively that lessons were not being learned. During WWII, safety clearly didn't have the priority it hopefully has today.

Next month's offering should be a type not done for a while – the Westland Wasp.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);
01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -
01/06/2016: Cessna 185 723* crashed on 22/11/1963 during an operational low-level navigation training flight below
50ft AGL (5 pages text, one diagram and 8 period images); 01/05/2016: Shackleton 1722 landed nosewheel unlocked at AFS Langebaanweg on 07/07/1960 during a routine training flight launched from AFS Ysterplaat (2½ pages text and 5 period images);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
87 19/09/68*;
watch this space!

Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 118

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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PostPosted: 07 May 2017, 10:32 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

I have plenty to crow about.

When one has done over 119 accident summaries involving different types and numerous ones of each type, without even looking for it, one becomes aware of certain trends. One such trend is the reality that certain aircraft types simply make more informative and fascinating accident summaries. Some examples thus far include the Shackleton, Buccaneer, Harvard, Dakota, Mirage III, Vampire and...... the Wasp!

Although I could never have imagined this to be so, since the Wasp is neither large nor impressive, this diminutive 'insect' makes for some truly spectacular summaries, so far without exception. The Alouette II and III simply cannot compare. It must be a sea water thing, although in their defence I have admittedly covered far more serious attrition on the Wasp than the other two types combined.

I am truly blessed to have done those Wasp accidents that I have and literally can't wait to tuck into the next.

Wasp 86's event goes into great detail as to the most likely cause of the technical failure and covers in fascinating detail the full extent of all the aircraft types and their serials involved in the search for the downed Wasp's occupants. It even tabulates the exact flying hours each aircraft serial flew in support.

I could not but include details regarding the SA Navy's contribution to t he search effort too.

Again, this is one accident summary which will not be found wanting.

I have said it in the past and I say it again: Although there are exceptions, the longer accident summaries generally are more informative and thus beneficial to the researcher. At 6 pages text, go figure!

Cock-a-doodle-dooooo!

Next month's aircraft type will hopefully be another diminutive type – the Vampire.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard


Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images); 01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -
01/06/2016: Cessna 185 723* crashed on 22/11/1963 during an operational low-level navigation training flight below 50ft AGL (5 pages text, one diagram and 8 period images);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 119

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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 Post subject: SAAF Research
PostPosted: 04 Jun 2017, 12:15 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All

Just the usual heads-up to confirm that SAAF RESEARCH Pages 57 and 58 will be distributed to subscribers next weekend.

Some highlights include: Aircraft allotment dates and fates for the B.34, Spitfire, Link Trainers and Mirage F1AZs; Impala Mk I and engine taken on charge dates; Puma, Super Frelon and Alouette III operational flight details; Harvard and C-47 sale details and Rand values; Dakota 6822's 1946 ground accident detailed; BK 117 VDF 020's pre-SAAF and early SAAF flight detail history plus more.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard


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 Post subject: Vampire Accident
PostPosted: 04 Jun 2017, 12:22 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

The Vampire pioneered jet aviation in the SAAF and as such despite its relative simplicity compared with today's fighter jets, it was obviously far from being a reliable mount. The type spawned enough attrition occurrences to keep me going through a number of life times. The reduced number of flying hours available to pilots during this time only exacerbated matters

I particularly enjoy the Vampire, although until I did its first accident summary, it was not a type that I particularly cared much for. In fact, up to this point I was in some indecision as to whether to include the type as a contender for my archive or not. The very first accident summary I compiled decided the course in its favour and I have had no reason to regret my decision thus far.

Next month's aircraft type will be the Alouette III in a completely new causation.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/06/2017: On 21/03/52, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);

01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);
01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);
01/07/2016: -


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/52;
212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
63 19/09/66;
watch this space!

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 120

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 02 Jul 2017, 11:42 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All,

This month's Alouette III release is without doubt the most interesting I have yet done for this aircraft and introduces a completely new causation to boot, not just for this aircraft but for all the types I have covered to date.

One learns much about paratrooping from the Draadkar and the standard operating procedures (SOPs) initially employed for this role. At this time, the formulation of SOPs regarding paratrooping from this new helicopter type was very much in a state of flux and experimentation. Unfortunately, this experimentation invariably resulted in incidents and accidents until the final SOPs were compiled, approved and issued.

Next month's aircraft type will be the second new aircraft type accident release for this year. Might it be one of your favourites? Watch this space!

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/07/2017: On 23/01/63, whilst undertaking unauthorised experimental cabin paratrooping exit trials from Alouette III 59, one jumper was injured after exiting the cabin, resulting in damage to the aircraft and causing aircraft controllability problems (3.5 pages text and 10 period images);
01/06/2017: On 21/03/52, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);
01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);
01/08/2016: Harvard 7185 forced landed on 31/03/1944 near Rietvlei Dam after the trainee pilot failed to consider fuel quantity and consumption and ran out of fuel during a practise cross-country flight (1 and 2/3rds pages text only);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/52;
212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
59(1) 23/01/63;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released To Date: 121

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month will only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Skymaster Incident
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2017, 12:58 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All

I'm sure you would agree that a new aircraft type occurrence is always potentially exciting, not least for the compiler! It is also the youngest attrition occurrence I have yet covered. Welcome the Douglas DC-4 Skymaster.

Although this incident is nothing spectacular and with no supporting period imagery for obvious reasons, it is essential that it be done in the interest of completeness. The disadvantage with four engines is you are four times more likely to have something go wrong with the engines when it does. The advantage is you have the other three powerplants to carry you through....

Next month's aircraft type will be another of my favourites, the graceful Italian - the Impala.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/08/2017: Skymaster 6903's engines were noted to have gone out of synchronisation while in the cruise shortly after departure from a base in northern SWA on 18/04/75 (¾ page text only);
01/07/2017: On 23/01/63, whilst undertaking unauthorised experimental cabin paratrooping exit trials from Alouette III 59, one jumper was injured after exiting the cabin, resulting in damage to the aircraft and causing aircraft controllability problems (3.5 pages text and 10 period images);
01/06/2017: On 21/03/52, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);
01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);
01/09/2016: Dakota 6809* forced landed fatally at Nyama Siding, Northern Rhodesia, on 28/09/1945,
after engine failure with complications during a Shuttle Service flight (12 pages text, 1 map and 14 period images);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;
watch this space!

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/52;
212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

6903 18/04/75;

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
59(1) 23/01/63;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released Above To Date: 122

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month may only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION





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 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Impala Incident Release
PostPosted: 28 Sep 2017, 11:05 
Offline

Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All

There is nothing particularly noteworthy regarding this incident besides the fact that the investigation was most professionally and thoroughly handled and led to a most complete summary which ticks all the boxes as regards getting to terms with the primary cause of this occurrence.

Somewhat noteworthily, only months previously, an identical occurrence involving exactly the same aircraft structure is also mentioned and the aircraft serial and date of the occurrence is given, so this is almost a two-in-one scenario.

The next release in early December involves a Shackleton mid-air collision whilst on an operational flight.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/10/2017: On 25/11/69 a part of Impala 499's external structure came adrift after taking off on a post maintenance test flight (2.5 pages text and 5 period images);
01/09/2017: -
01/08/2017: Skymaster 6903's engines were noted to have gone out of synchronisation while in the cruise shortly after departure from a base in northern SWA on 18/04/75 (¾ page text only);
01/07/2017: On 23/01/63, whilst undertaking unauthorised experimental cabin paratrooping exit trials from Alouette III 59, one jumper was injured after exiting the cabin, resulting in damage to the aircraft and causing aircraft controllability problems (3.5 pages text and 10 period images);
01/06/2017: On 21/03/52, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);
01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);
01/10/2016: Buccaneer 412 landed at AFB Waterkloof on 10/02/1970 with its arresting hook lowered during a
heavy downpour after being called back from a Sortie 2 flight (3 pages and 7 period images);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
499 25/11/69;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
1722 07/07/60;
1723 26/02/58;
watch this space!

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/52;
212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

6903 18/04/75;

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
59(1) 23/01/63;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released Above To Date: 123

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course when legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month may only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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PostPosted: 28 Sep 2017, 11:32 
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Joined: 13 Jul 2004, 13:06
Posts: 3332
Location: In .... S.E.A & M.E.N.A. et al
Hi Clinton
Thanks for the sterling effort.
As a humble opinion/input for consideration, I do not know how successful the return on investment is per accident summary, ie.e. selling it in a "piece by piece' fashion. I do not expect reply or comment on the financial implication.
Have you considered combining the available accident reports into a single publication and selling it as a book - I would sure be interested in such a offer...? Maybe separate bvolumes for (1) Fighter; (2) Helicopter and (3) Transport/Utility Fix Wing...
Food for thought [-o<


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PostPosted: 28 Sep 2017, 12:12 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi Spice,

Thanks for your input.

I have indeed considered this and certainly the desire (and passion!) is there, BUT just nervous about how much interest there would be to make it a worthwhile undertaking. Maybe down the line.....???

Thanks again

Clinton Barnard


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PostPosted: 28 Sep 2017, 12:43 
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Joined: 13 Jul 2004, 13:06
Posts: 3332
Location: In .... S.E.A & M.E.N.A. et al
Synonymous wrote:
Hi Spice,

Thanks for your input.

I have indeed considered this and certainly the desire (and passion!) is there, BUT just nervous about how much interest there would be to make it a worthwhile undertaking. Maybe down the line.....???

Thanks again

Clinton Barnard


:smt023 [-o<

Maybe run a bot of a marketing poll, get some advice from Winston Brent, piggy back on his series....?

Thanks for the prompt reply

Regards from Abu Dhabi


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 Post subject: Mid Air Collision
PostPosted: 27 Oct 2017, 11:27 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All

Surprise!

To introduce a measure of unpredictability into the fray, I have decided to go with the next release since it is good to go. Maybe next month will lie fallow?

Beware! The Bird Catcher.

This month's release considers how the Shackleton was an able 'bird catcher' without even trying. Although short, this summary is surprisingly informative as regards sea birds and their threat to low flying aircraft.

My next release, will be my regular, now annual, Harvard offering. Now I know that will get some people's attention....

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/11/2017: Shackleton 1722 suffered the invasion of a large sea bird during an operational flight from South West Africa (now Namibia) on 30/06/65 (1.5 pages text and 4 period images);[b]
01/10/2017: On 25/11/69 Impala 499's one external panel came adrift after taking off for a post maintenance test flight (2.5 pages text and 5 period images);
01/09/2017: -
01/08/2017: Skymaster 6903's engines were noted to have gone out of synchronisation while in the cruise shortly after departure from a base in northern SWA on 18/04/75 (¾ page text only);
01/07/2017: On 23/01/63, whilst undertaking unauthorised experimental cabin paratrooping exit trials from Alouette III 59, one jumper was injured after exiting the cabin, resulting in damage to the aircraft and causing aircraft controllability problems (3.5 pages text and 10 period images);
01/06/2017: On 21/03/52, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);
01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);
01/11/2016: During an air show at Dunnottar on 03/08/1963, Hercules 406 discharged its cargo of paratroopers in such a way as to result in injury to spectators and damage to private property (5 pages text, 1 diagram and 1 period aerial photo);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/68;
487 03/01/68;
499 25/11/69;
508 24/11/69;
512 18/08/69;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/56*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/57;
1718 05/10/57; 09/11/59; 08/08/63*;
[b]1722[b] 07/07/60;[b]30/06/65;[b]
1723 26/02/58;


Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/70;
415 26/07/65; 06/03/69; 16/10/69*;
417 30/10/65*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/57;
353 26/04/66*;
357 11/05/66*;
359 04/03/66;
367 30/09/65;

Cessna 185

713 26/11/69;
717 29/01/66;
722 02/08/65*;
723 22/11/63*;
744 25/08/66*;
751 14/05/69;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/69;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/64;
817 06/05/68;
821 15/03/69*;
824 15/11/65;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/52;
212 03/02/53*;
233 08/10/54*;
236 22/09/54*;
246 24/11/55*;
268 20/10/65; 27/01/66;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/58;
5431 12/03/62*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/45;
6807 28/08/43;
6809 28/09/45*;
6822 23/01/46;
6832 26/01/66;
6847 08/07/45*;
6853 01/04/45;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

6903 18/04/75;

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/72;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/63;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/43;
7011 13/04/43*;
7060 10/08/43;
7074 19/01/44*;
7085 11/12/43*;
7091 21/10/43*;
7092 17/05/43* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/44;
7097 03/08/43;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/43;
7107 21/01/44;
7108 05/11/43*;
7119 17/05/43* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/44*;
7122 11/11/43*;
7125 12/04/44*;
7126 25/04/44;
7134 21/12/43*;
7141 19/01/43;
7160 31/03/44 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/43;
7168 13/10/43 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/43*;
7174 16/08/43;
7185 31/03/44;
7195 20/01/44;
7198 11/01/44;
7200 19/02/43;
7205 21/11/43* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/44* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/43* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/43;
7231 13/10/43 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/44*;
7251 05/07/43*;
7260 17/05/43; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/44;
7264 23/04/43;
7266 04/10/43;
7274 06/09/43;
7277 29/07/43*;
7278 09/02/44;
7281 04/05/43*;
7283 27/03/44*;
7289 09/09/43;
7318 06/09/43*;
7351 27/01/44;
7388 09/11/43;
7391 26/11/43;
7418 19/04/44*;
7419 05/01/44*;
7452 13/03/44*;
[b]watch this space!


Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/66*;
18 20/07/67; 01/08/67; 02/08/67; 04/08/67;
21 06/06/61; 22/04/66;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/66;
43 07/01/63;
47 25/02/66;
56 08/01/66*;
59(1) 23/01/63;
63 19/09/66;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/67; 15/08/69;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/54;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/63;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/64*;
82 08/08/67;
84 18/03/68;
86 25/09/64*;
87 19/09/68*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released Above To Date: 124

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course as legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month may only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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 Post subject: Harvard Accident
PostPosted: 02 Dec 2017, 14:15 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2015, 13:41
Posts: 47
Hi All

With the passing of another year, I released 11 attrition occurrences out of a maximum potential of 12 during the last year. Of these, only one ultimately involved a write-off, the balance all being repairable. Furthermore, only two fatalities arose from these 11 occurrences.

Two new aircraft types were introduced during 2017: the Canberra and DC-4.

Although my 'crystal ball' is a little cloudy as to the second half of the year, the first half is more certain and will contain occurrences for the Sabre, Dakota, Alouette II, Super Frelon, Cessna 185 and Hercules. The second half of the year will see at least one new aircraft type making its appearance too, however the latter's identity will only be revealed at its release.

This month's Harvard offering is not the first causation of its kind for this type that I have covered, but its been some years since the last one. It is also the youngest Harvard accident I've done to date, but it still has wrinkles!

Harvard fans will enjoy this one, as it covers all the 'bases' as far as a 'nice' accident is concerned, as supported by period image accompaniment.

The only 'twist' in this summary is the eventual fate of this aircraft, but that is explained in the text.

The next release and first for the new year, will most likely be in early February, and will involve the Canadair Sabre.

With thanks.

Clinton Barnard

Updates (one year back): (* confirmed write-off)

01/12/2017: Harvard 7088 struck a ground feature during authorised operational low flying and crashed on 23/05/1944 (2.5 pages text plus 5 period images);
01/11/2017: Shackleton 1722 suffered the invasion of a large sea bird during an operational flight from South West Africa (now Namibia) on 30/06/1965 (1.5 pages text and 4 period images);
01/10/2017: On 25/11/1969 Impala 499's one external panel came adrift after taking off for a post maintenance test flight (2.5 pages text and 5 period images);
01/09/2017: -
01/08/2017: Skymaster 6903's engines were noted to have gone out of synchronisation while in the cruise shortly after departure from a base in northern SWA on 18/04/1975 (¾ page text only);
01/07/2017: On 23/01/1963, whilst undertaking unauthorised experimental cabin paratrooping exit trials from Alouette III 59, one jumper was injured after exiting the cabin, resulting in damage to the aircraft and causing aircraft controllability problems (3.5 pages text and 10 period images);
01/06/2017: On 21/03/1952, following maintenance to its mainwheels, Vampire 206 overran the runway at Swartkop on landing, causing considerable aircraft damage (1¾ pages text only);
01/05/2017: Wasp 86* ditched near Dassen Island on 25/09/1964 while on a communications flight between ship and shore, resulting in one fatality on board (6 pages text only);
01/04/2017: Harvard 7195's propeller struck a walking pilot on the aerodrome on 20/01/1944 (2 pages text only);
01/03/2017: On 06/05/1968 Mirage III 817's pilot aborted take-off resulting in an avoidable major accident (2.5 pages text plus 8 period images);
01/02/2017: Super Frelon 301's pilot was warned to return to base by the air traffic controller only seconds after lifting off on 15/08/1969, due to an abnormal situation prevailing on the exterior of the aircraft whilst on a transport flight from home base (1 page text only);
01/01/2017: Canberra 459's undercarriage suffered aircrew induced damage on 17/04/1972 during circuits and landings at Waterkloof (1.5 pages and 10 period images);
01/12/2016: Alouette II 21 struck an obstacle with its main rotor near Palmiet whilst low flying during a conversion to type course on 06/06/1961 (2.25 pages text and 2 period images);


PRESENT ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ARCHIVE updated monthly (* confirmed write-off)

Aermacchi MB 326 Impala

472 10/09/1968;
487 03/01/1968;
499 25/11/1969;
508 24/11/1969;
512 18/08/1969;

Aermacchi/Aeritalia AM-3CM Bosbok

Auster

5411 15/06/1956*;

Avro MR Mk 3 Shackleton

1716 20/11/1957;
1718 05/10/1957; 09/11/1959; 08/08/1963*;
1722 07/07/1960; 30/06/1965;
1723 26/02/1958;

Blackburn S MK 50 Buccaneer

412 10/02/1970;
415 26/07/1965; 06/03/1969; 16/10/1969*;
417 30/10/1965*;

Canadair CL-13B Sabre Mk 6

351 04/04/1957;
353 26/04/1966*;
357 11/05/1966*;
359 04/03/1966;
367 30/09/1965;
watch this space!

Cessna 185

713 26/11/1969;
717 29/01/1966;
722 02/08/1965*;
723 22/11/1963*;
744 25/08/1966*;
751 14/05/1969;

Cessna 320

ZS-EJL (former SAAF serial 771) 09/10/1969;

Dassault Mirage III

816 28/05/1964;
817 06/05/1968;
821 15/03/1969*;
824 15/11/1965;

De Havilland Vampire

206 21/03/1952;
212 03/02/1953*;
233 08/10/1954*;
236 22/09/1954*;
246 24/11/1955*;
268 20/10/1965; 27/01/1966;

Dornier Do 27A

5430 03/11/1958;
5431 12/03/1962*;

Douglas C-47/Dakota

6801 10/09/1945;
6807 28/08/1943;
6809 28/09/1945*;
6822 23/01/1946;
6832 26/01/1966;
6847 08/07/1945*;
6853 01/04/1945;

Douglas C-54/DC-4 Skymaster

6903 18/04/1975;

English Electric Canberra

459 17/04/1972;

Hawker Siddeley HS.125-400B Mercurius

Lockheed C-130 Hercules

406 03/08/1963;

North American Texan/Harvard

7001 04/12/1943;
7011 13/04/1943*;
7060 10/08/1943;
7074 19/01/1944*;
7085 11/12/1943*;
7088 23/05/1944;
7091 21/10/1943*;
7092 17/05/1943* (see 7119);
7094 08/02/1944;
7097 03/08/1943;
7099/Hind 23 12/03/1943;
7107 21/01/1944;
7108 05/11/1943*;
7119 17/05/1943* (see 7092);
7121 24/02/1944*;
7122 11/11/1943*;
7125 12/04/1944*;
7126 25/04/1944;
7134 21/12/1943*;
7141 19/01/1943;
7160 31/03/1944 (see 7217);
7164 19/08/1943;
7168 13/10/1943 (see 7231);
7170 12/06/1943*;
7174 16/08/1943;
7185 31/03/1944;
7195 20/01/1944;
7198 11/01/1944;
7200 19/02/1943;
7205 21/11/1943* (see 7227);
7217 31/03/1944* (see 7160);
7227 21/11/1943* (see 7205);
7228 26/04/1943;
7231 13/10/1943 (see 7168);
7241 16/03/1944*;
7251 05/07/1943*;
7260 17/05/1943; 14/12/43*;
7262 11/01/1944;
7264 23/04/1943;
7266 04/10/1943;
7274 06/09/1943;
7277 29/07/1943*;
7278 09/02/1944;
7281 04/05/1943*;
7283 27/03/1944*;
7289 09/09/1943;
7318 06/09/1943*;
7351 27/01/1944;
7388 09/11/1943;
7391 26/11/1943;
7418 19/04/1944*;
7419 05/01/1944*;
7452 13/03/1944*;

Piaggio P.166S Albatross

Sud Est SE 3130 Alouette II

16 03/10/1966*;
18 20/07/1967; 01/08/1967; 02/08/1967; 04/08/1967;
21 06/06/1961; 22/04/1966;

Sud Est SE3160/SA316B Alouette III

39 19/04/1966;
43 07/01/1963;
47 25/02/1966;
56 08/01/1966*;
59(1) 23/01/1963;
63 19/09/1966;

Sud Aviation SA 321L Super Frelon

301 25/07/1967; 15/08/1969;

Sud Aviation SA 330 Puma

Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX

5622* 03/04/1954;

Swearingen Merlin Mk IVA

Transall C-160Z

Vickers Viscount

150 19/03/1963;

Westland HAS Mk 1 Wasp

81 17/06/1964*;
82 08/08/1967;
84 18/03/1968;
86 25/09/1964*;
87 19/09/1968*;


Total Separate Accident/Incident Archive Occurrences Released Above To Date: 125

Where no entry appears under a specific type, this means that the type qualifies, but that I have not yet processed any occurrence involving this type ie, watch this space!

PURCHASE YOUR FAVOURITE SAAF ACCIDENT SUMMARIES

How would you like to receive your personal copy of my Accident Summaries? Better still, how would you like to receive them in your inbox in original full length version with full supporting period and other image accompaniment with relevant tables/charts/diagrams/transcripts etc where appropriate!? Now it is possible. With Dean's consent, commencing about the start of each month and every month thereafter, I will announce the availability of one previously unpublished Accident Summary here.

Summaries vary in length from about ¾ page of text to as many as 12 excluding images and image captions.
Note that not all occurrences are image accompanied depending on the circumstances of the occurrence and what copy of the Court/Board of Inquiry/Station Investigation I get to process.

Accidents will cover the time period 01/10/42 to 31/12/75 as per the high-end limitations imposed by current legislation in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act and involve all types of attrition, both benign and spectacular, to exclusively the following types: the Harvard/Texan, C-47/Dakota, C-54/Skymaster, C-130 Hercules, Transall C-160Z, Merlin Mk IVA, HS.125 Mercurius, Viscount, Shackleton, Piaggio P.166S Albatross, Cessna 185, AM-3CM Bosbok, two Do 27, one Auster, one Spitfire, Canberra, Buccaneer, Mirage III, Vampire, Sabre, Impala, Wasp, Alouette II and III, Puma and the Super Frelon. No single type will be represented more than twice over a given 12-month period with exception of the Harvard for which a minimum/maximum of two Harvard occurrences will appear in every 12-month period guaranteed. Other types may be added in due course as legislation relaxes.

All summaries appearing in the database above are available for purchase by anyone at any time at R40 per summary all inclusive.

Simply let me know exactly what aircraft types you would potentially be interested in from the database and give me your e-mail, and I will contact you as soon as a summary involving that aircraft type becomes available for purchase.

If you are interested, please contact me on: oopsaahcast@yahoo.com or telephone: +27 (0)31 261 8748 (H + W) all hours or 072 2749 032 (sms only please) for payment details or if you have any queries regarding this subject.

All purchases will be subject to my terms and conditions and copyright, which include among others, that no summary or part thereof (including images) may be reproduced on any site or publication or other communications systems for any purpose whatsoever and that summaries are for personal (private) use exclusively and may not be distributed to a second party for any reason whatsoever. If any uncertainty exists, please run your plans by me. By making payment, the purchaser will thus consent to having read and fully agreed to these terms and conditions.

Upon request, I may waiver the copyright for a particular purchased accident summary to be reproduced verbatim on a site or in a publication at my sole discretion, provided that the source is acknowledged.

Although this system is prone to abuse, I would strongly advise that individuals would refrain from doing so, since it may well compromise the success of this effort and if I feel that it is not being sustainably successful, I will have no choice but to discontinue this effort and the future of summaries being available to the public will be forever jeopardised. By personally honouring the above terms, you will thus be investing in the future of more summaries being made available, both for your personal information and for that of others.

Note: Due to logistical limitations on my part, payments made in a given month may only see that summary e-mailed during the first week of the following month.

There is plenty of potential SAAF aircraft history and operational procedure waiting to be unlocked and revealed to the glory of SAAF aviation history. Please allow me to make it happen for YOU!

In the interests of flying safety and preserving SAAF history.

Regards

Clinton Barnard

HISTORY THROUGH ATTRITION


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