The SAAF Forum

Discussion on the SAAF and other southern African air forces.
It is currently 23 Jan 2019, 08:52

All times are UTC + 2 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: 11 Dec 2018, 08:35 
Offline

Joined: 06 Aug 2010, 10:40
Posts: 159
Location: Namibia West Coast
Hi Everyone,

Almost done with my Mirage III CZ. Now I noticed something apparently only on SAAF and Israeli CZ/CJs. There is a horizontal slit in the main gear doors that I haven't seen on any model kit as yet. Can someone tell what the purpose of this slit is?

Regards,

Pierre


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Dec 2018, 09:43 
Offline

Joined: 20 Aug 2010, 14:40
Posts: 1849
Hi atc1225

It was mentioned on one of the threads, but I am struggling to find the thread.

If I recall correctly its an inspection slot, could also be related to the manual release mechanism.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Dec 2018, 11:04 
Offline

Joined: 06 Aug 2010, 10:40
Posts: 159
Location: Namibia West Coast
That is a plausible purpose, thanks Mars. Not easy to scratch build this. :?

Pierre


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Dec 2018, 15:48 
Offline

Joined: 20 Aug 2010, 14:40
Posts: 1849
Depends on the scale, your options are as follows....

1) Paint a small black grey rectangle to represent the slot, or use a decal.

2) Drill out the slot and square it out.

3) cut out the plastic as required, and rebuild the back edger with plastic card.

4) Or, just leave it no one will notice.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Dec 2018, 21:42 
Offline

Joined: 31 Aug 2010, 15:01
Posts: 4372
Location: Centurion, Pretoria, SA
Mars wrote:
Depends on the scale, your options are as follows....

1) Paint a small black grey rectangle to represent the slot, or use a decal.

2) Drill out the slot and square it out.

3) cut out the plastic as required, and rebuild the back edger with plastic card.

4) Or, just leave it no one will notice.


Comments :
1) :shock:
2) :smt023 easy to do. 5 minutes work.
3) :?:
4) :( whaaaaat ????


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 14 Dec 2018, 11:57 
Offline

Joined: 20 Aug 2010, 14:40
Posts: 1849
I am surprised how big the slot actually is.

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 14 Dec 2018, 16:02 
Offline

Joined: 06 Aug 2010, 10:40
Posts: 159
Location: Namibia West Coast
Mistral wrote:
Mars wrote:
Depends on the scale, your options are as follows....

1) Paint a small black grey rectangle to represent the slot, or use a decal.

2) Drill out the slot and square it out.

3) cut out the plastic as required, and rebuild the back edger with plastic card.

4) Or, just leave it no one will notice.


Comments :
1) :shock:
2) :smt023 easy to do. 5 minutes work.
3) :?:
4) :( whaaaaat ????


:lol: Yip no 2 is what I attempted and it looks not bad at all. Happy how it turned out. I see only the Israeli's and ours have those.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 14 Dec 2018, 22:54 
Offline

Joined: 20 Aug 2010, 14:40
Posts: 1849
Mistral wrote:
Mars wrote:
Depends on the scale, your options are as follows....

1) Paint a small black grey rectangle to represent the slot, or use a decal.

2) Drill out the slot and square it out.

3) cut out the plastic as required, and rebuild the back edger with plastic card.

4) Or, just leave it no one will notice.


Comments :
1) :shock:
2) :smt023 easy to do. 5 minutes work.
3) :?:
4) :( whaaaaat ????


Responses:

1) Would you cut out the slot if the it was 72nd model or even 48 for that matter?
Sometimes its easier to mimic a particular feature than actually create the feature. An accurate representation can also be more effective from a scale perspective.

3) variation of 2, instead of drilling out the hole, the slot is cut our with blade to create the rectangular shape then the back edge of the door is reconstruct with a plastic card insert.

4) How many people actually now this fact or even to look for it if they did?
I didn't until atc1225 mentioned that it was specific to the CZ/CJ. Also it depends on the configuration, if the doors were closed this feature would be even less obvious. Not many people look at the underside of the model. If the model was entered into a competition points won't be lost because the slots weren't cut out.
Option 1 would be applicable here, as a quick solution if the doors were closed as very little light would get into the wheel wells anyway.

Its a bit like your USAF F104 build, I wouldn't have known that the twin sidewinder configuration was not used by the USAF unless you mentioned it but its still a good model. Modelling allows for creative license, not everything needs to be rivet counter perfect.

Here is a direct example. Did anyone notice the slots were missing and does this take anything away from the model?

https://www.largescaleplanes.com/articles/article.php?aid=2581


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 15 Dec 2018, 06:31 
Offline

Joined: 31 Aug 2010, 15:01
Posts: 4372
Location: Centurion, Pretoria, SA
Marc, it all depends on the modeller and his/her passion about the subject matter. I love the Mirage III series and therefore spend the extra time making sure details are correct. I've cut the slots out on my CZ models in both 48th and 32nd scale. ScaleWorx kindly provided slotted resin doors for the BZ conversion in 48th. Demarcate the slot, use a pin vice to drill pilot holes and then finish off with a sharp blade.

In terms of accuracy for competitions, this may factor depending on the rules and judges' knowledge of the subject matter. However, based on our GRSM rules it doesn't matter as build and finish quality is all that counts. So under those rules, rather go with your option 1 or 4 instead of risking having a messed up hole which may detract from points.

Happy holidays :smt023


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 26 Dec 2018, 13:28 
Offline

Joined: 06 Aug 2010, 10:40
Posts: 159
Location: Namibia West Coast
Sorry guys, hope this is the last question #-o

I must say Eduard have done their home work on the decal placement on SAAF Mirages. My heart skipped a beat when I looked at the pictures on this website and realised that the ejection warning triangles were placed behind the intakes on most bare metal SAAF Mirages. I had placed mine in front of the cone as in Eduard's instructions on Mirage 814 "O". Low and behold there is a picture of a bare metal 814 in the gallery and the triangle is ahead of the cone as in Eduard's instuction. Seems that on 805 "E" and 814 "O" the triangle was placed in front of the intake cone =D>

My question is: Did the bottom airbrakes have a yellow rim around the red as on top or were they solid red?

Thanks for any help again guys,

Regards,
Pierre


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 27 Dec 2018, 17:22 
Offline

Joined: 31 Aug 2010, 15:01
Posts: 4372
Location: Centurion, Pretoria, SA
Hi Pierre.

IIICZ #813 at the War Museum in Joburg has the red with yellow trim on the lower airbrakes. Aircraft is in the later soft edge buff/green camo.

Hope this helps :smt023


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: 13 Jan 2019, 14:10 
Offline

Joined: 06 Aug 2010, 10:40
Posts: 159
Location: Namibia West Coast
Thanks Mistral, I took a chance and did it with the yellow borders. Thanks for the help again.

Pierre


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 2 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group