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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2011, 15:53 
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Joined: 04 Feb 2011, 14:22
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Propeller, I did a camp at Ondangwa during December 1988...I think my date is correct?

I saw you've mentioned the SAM 8. This photo was taken of me standing in a SAM but I always thought it was a SAM 9. Was there ever a SAM 9 or is this a SAM 8?

Herewith the photo:
Image


Last edited by Theuns on 04 Feb 2011, 16:33, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2011, 16:29 
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Joined: 19 Oct 2005, 12:39
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Location: United Kingdom
The photo shown is of a SAM-9.

A SAM-8 was also captured and is a much bigger vehicle has three wheels each side, see page 229 of SAAF at War for one on a low bed trailer.


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2011, 16:36 
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Thanks for the information and for clearing it up for me W407594F! I will have a look at the SAM-8.


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2011, 16:41 
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Location: ILS RWY19, FACT (Cape Town)
Welcome Theuns :smt023

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 04 Feb 2011, 19:30 
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Propeller wrote:
Herewith a photo of the aircon at the back of the cabin and a scanned section of our squadron photo showing the missiles in the cut away cannisters more clearly:

Image



I have always wondered what the little white "+" painted on the radar dishes was for? I often see this painted on other RADAR systems as well.

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 13:32 
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I was also in 250 1986/87...120 Squadron...

We did our training at Airspace Control School at Waterkloof and then were sent to the "farm", and it was a farm.Towards the the middle of 87 we went Rundu for the remainder of our time...I also did a camp in Ondangwa in Dec 88 I think.
To answer a few questions...Theuns is standing in a Sam 9...I think that we had 2 of them but only remember one on the squadron...when we had visitors it would be taken out into the bush.
The Sam 8 was a much larger vehicle with 6 wheels...I think there were also 2 of them.They were captured in Angola in 87 and I can remember them being loaded onto low beds at Rundu for transport back to the "states"(South Africa).Both had been badly damaged by the artillery.
The white cross on the radar dish of the FU was used for lining up the FU with the AU.There was a cable link between the AU and its 2 FU's.Target data was sent to the FU via this link and in order for the AU to send the correct information the relative positions of the vehicles had to be known to the computer system.The AU also had a cross on its radar dish and using a small telescope mounted on each turret the vehicle turrets were manually lined up.
The cactus vehicles had petrol engines which were generators for the electrics...each wheel had its own electric motor.The steering,brakes,jacks,suspension and turret were all hydraulic.They were quite easy to drive but the size and limited visibility took a bit of practice.


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 14:46 
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Welcome Danny and thanks for the post. :smt023


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 18:13 
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Joined: 13 Jul 2004, 23:09
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Thanks to all who have posted, it is great to read some "fresh" information for a change. :smt023 \:D/


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 20:28 
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Thank you for the welcome Kremlin and welcome to you too Danny! :smt023

As I have mentioned I was at “die plaas” during 1982 and 1983. At the end of my basic training one or two of my friends were picked for chef training and due to the fact that I could hardly boil water at that stage I volunteered for 250. Don’t get me wrong...there is nothing wrong to be a chef but I just felt that I wanted a bit more action.

During my three months basic training at Valhalla we stayed in tents and at 250 I also stayed in a tent for another year or so. Bungalows were reserved for “Blougatte, Oumanne and Oupas”.

A photo of our tents at 250:
Image

A few friends and I volunteered for Hilda training and we were stationed at 121 Squadron. Training was vigorous with lots of theory, running around, deployment, opf@%%e, guarding, etc, etc. Training lasted for a few months.

A photo of 121 Squadron from the guard tower on the North Western side of the camp:
Image

Propeller mentioned tents being blown away. This happens to us as well and many tents were destroyed:
Image

Practical exercises at ST. Lucia (Tappet) was a highlight.
We drove Land Rovers with our live missiles at the back. The Hilda system consisting of a Director and Launcher were transported on lowbeds:
Image

The Director:
Image

Missile away:
Image

Our tents at St. Lucia:
Image

At the end of December 1982 or maybe the beginning of 1983 our Squadron was called up to Ondangwa for deployment. We drove all the way up there and it took a few days.

Herewith a photo of a portion of our convoy:
Image

We stayed in tents and it was HOT:
Image

And filled MANY sandbags to protect our systems:
Image

A few photos of the Launcher with live missiles:
Image

Image

Image

After two months or so many of us returned to “the farm” leaving behind a skeleton crew to look after the systems. Later in 1983 three of us returned to Ondangwa as a skeleton crew. That was pure bliss and our camp was close to the runway next to Fort Rev. Fort Rev was a camp for the South African Special Forces.

Herewith our home which consists of an IG (Inkruipgat), tent, kitchen, etc.
Image

Image

At the end of 1985 and the end of 1988 I did camps at Ondangwa. We were then stationed close to the Radar Squadron.

Herewith a photo of the radar units:
Image

Well, I hope you have enjoyed the tour!


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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 20:52 
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Joined: 23 Dec 2006, 06:12
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Location: Gauteng, South Africa
Hi Theuns

How would you rate the performance of that missle system against the Migs under operational circuimstances.
I was at Oshivello in 1989 during the UNTAG period and always half wondered how well protected we were in the surface to air department during the Bosoorlog.

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 21:39 
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Hi Theuns! Thanks for cleaing up a little mystery for me, I've always wondered what the director actually was... there was (is?) one at AFB Swartkop and I had always assumed that it was a search light :oops:

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 21:42 
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A hearty welcome Danny :smt006

Cheers

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 21:42 
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Danny wrote:
The white cross on the radar dish of the FU was used for lining up the FU with the AU.There was a cable link between the AU and its 2 FU's.Target data was sent to the FU via this link and in order for the AU to send the correct information the relative positions of the vehicles had to be known to the computer system.The AU also had a cross on its radar dish and using a small telescope mounted on each turret the vehicle turrets were manually lined up..


Thanks Danny :smt023

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 22:02 
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Awesome photo's Theuns :smt023

Is that you with the "min dae" fingers ... :?:

Cheers

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 Post subject: Re: 250 ADAG
PostPosted: 05 Feb 2011, 22:13 
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koffiepit wrote:
Hi Theuns
How would you rate the performance of that missle system against the Migs under operational circuimstances.
I was at Oshivello in 1989 during the UNTAG period and always half wondered how well protected we were in the surface to air department during the Bosoorlog.


Hi Koffiepit,
As far as I know the Hilda system never had the opportunity to be tested in a combat situation by our forces. One potential shortfall of the Hilda system was that is was subsonic. Another factor was the fact that it only had a range of approximately 6 kilometres. It was also no-good at night or with targets flying under the cover of clouds. The missile was manually guided by an operator sitting in the bin of the Director viewing the target through fixed binoculars and had both the target and missile in sight. The operator guided the missile to the target by way of a joy (thumb) stick. Accuracy depended on the operator and during our exercises at St Lucia the strike rates were rather good.

H1017412 wrote:
Hi Theuns! Thanks for cleaing up a little mystery for me, I've always wondered what the director actually was... there was (is?) one at AFB Swartkop and I had always assumed that it was a search light :oops:


:lol: :lol: :lol:

H1017412, it was great sitting in the bin. The bin was able to turn left and right and when you did that the launcher turned left and right as well. When the operator moved his binoculars up and down the missiles went up and down on the launcher as well. The launcher and director were linked by way of a cable.

Kremlin wrote:
Awesome photo's Theuns :smt023

Is that you with the "min dae" fingers ... :?:

Cheers


Thank you Kremlin! :smt023
No it was one of my friends..I took the photo! :D


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