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PostPosted: 12 Apr 2019, 09:20 
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12 April

1918
Information Note
W.L. Jordan, a South African pilot flying a Sopwith Camel, whilst serving in the Royal Air Force and Royal Naval Air Service (World War 1), shot-down a German aircraft. This was his 20th conformed kill.
J. Bell, a South African serving in the Royal Flying Corps Force, shot-down two German Albatros DV’s, whilst flying a Sopwith Camel. This was his 17th and 18th confirmed kills.

1935
Information Note
The prototype Bristol Blenheim made its maiden flight.

1941
Aircraft Deliveries
Hawker Hart ‘Trainer’ (Serial: 440and 455) / Hind (Serial: 185)
Sorties
1 Sqn: Four Hurricanes continued a ferry to Egypt.

1943
Accidents and Losses
An Airspeed Oxford (3795) during an Instrument Flight Rules sortie, crashed when it broke-up in flight.

1944
Accidents and Losses
A Harvard Mk-IIA (7125) was involved in a fatal accident during air-to-ground training.
A Ventura (6457), allocated to 27 Squadron crashed during a night flying sortie in the Darling area, all four on-board sustained fatal injuries.

1951
Operations and Statistics
On 12 April 1951, just two months after flying its 1,000 sorties, No 2 Squadron SA Air Force completed 2,000 sorties in support of UN forces in Korea.

1975
Information Note
Members of the BOSS and SA MI met with members from UNITA to discuss the situation in Angola.

1983
Accidents and Losses
A Mirage IIICZ (810) of 2 Squadron, experienced an engine flame-out – unrecoverable in the Hoedspruit area. The pilot ejected.
Sorties
A 44 Squadron DC-4 Skymaster, the ‘Spook’ (Ghost) arrived in the operational area to conduct Electronic Intelligence missions along the SWA/Angola border


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PostPosted: 12 Apr 2019, 09:20 
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Thanks Upsun :smt023


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PostPosted: 13 Apr 2019, 17:52 
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13 April

1942
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Hart ‘Trainer’ / Serial(s): 2042.

1943
Accidents and Losses
A Harvard Mk IIA (7011) was involved in a fatal low-level accident.
A Curtiss P-40D (AK637) crashed after its engine failed; the aircraft belonged to 2 Squadron.
Three Bostons allocated to 24 Squadron were lost during operations: Z2183 Abandoned in flight, four fatalities; Z2195 Missing; three presumed dead and Z2212: No further information.

1944
Accidents and Losses
A Bristol Beaufort was involved in a fatal accident.

1945
Accidents and Losses
Two Spitfire Mk IXs (MH944 and PT793) were shot-down, the pilots were fatally wounded. The aircraft belonged to 7 Squadron.

1974
Accidents and Losses
A C-185 (743) was involved in a fatal accident, there were two persons on-board.

1983
1 Squadron and 3 Squadron deployed to Ondangwa; their mission: Close Air Support standby.

1988
The Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team (operating Impala Mk 1) flew a show at Franschoek, during which the number 5 (470) aircraft encountered problems, Capt. Kobus Griesel safely ejected from the aircraft. Also reported to have taken place on 16 April...

2000
Accidents and Losses
A C-185 (729) was involved in a fatal accident.


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PostPosted: 14 Apr 2019, 08:32 
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14 April

1941
The following sorties took place:
 1 Squadron. Three Hurricanes ferry to Egypt.
 51 Flight. Two Ju-52’s flew Air Support missions from Nairobi.

1942
A Hind (149) crashed.

1943
A Baltimore (FA187) allocated to 21 Squadron, was involved in a fatal accident due to fuel starvation on the return leg from an interdiction mission.

1944
A Curtiss P-40D (FX679), allocated to 5 Squadron, did not return from an interdiction mission, the pilot is presumed not to have survived the accident. (C/L?)

1945
A Curtiss P-40D Kittyhawk (FX537) was written-off following damaged sustained due to hostile ground fire.

1989

An AM3C Bosbok (956) crashed in the SWA Operational Area.


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PostPosted: 15 Apr 2019, 09:18 
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15 April

1939
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Hart 1 / Serial(s): K2439; K3851; K3883 and K3885

1941
The following sorties took place:
1 Squadron. Four Hurricanes ferried to Egypt.

1942
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Boston (AL757), allocated to 24 Squadron crashed during landing.
A Northrop Nomad Mk1 (1250) was involved in an accident in the East London area.

1943
26 Squadron, on board the Queen Mary arrived in Freetown (departed South Africa on 09 Apr 1943).
A Supermarine Spitfire (ER987), allocated to 40 Squadron crashed during a low-level tactical reconnaissance mission.

1944
Operations and Operational Statistics:
1 Squadron. Over the period 14/15 April, the squadron destroyed three Me-410; one FW-190; three Me-109 and one Ju-88 during air combat engagements; two Me-109s also damaged. =D> =D>

1945
A 2 Squadron Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (MJ533) suffered engine failure and crash landed.

1965
Information Note: The prototype S330 Puma made its maiden flight in France. The Air Force took delivery of its first aircraft in 1969 and became the second largest operator of this aircraft type in the World.

1985
The South African Defence Force withdrew from Southern Angola, following the failure of the Joint Military Monitoring Mission. The operation was referred to as Op DIKMELK.

1990
An S-316 Alouette III (56[2]) was involved in an accident.

1992
The Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team (operating Impala Mk 1) conducted show number 230 at Military Academy.

2000
The South African Museum’s Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (“5553”) crashed at Swartkop.
The Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team (operating PC-7 Mk II) conducted show number 358 and 359 at the Swartkop Air Show.


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PostPosted: 16 Apr 2019, 09:25 
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16 April

1941
The following sorties took place:
1 Squadron. Four Hurricanes ferried to Egypt.
51 Flight. Two Ju-52s flew Air Support from Khartoum to Nairobi and from Mogadishu to Nairobi.

1942
A 40 Squadron Hurricane was involved in a fatal accident.

1943
Two de Havilland DH-82s Tiger Moth (2391 & 2319) crashed (one fatal accident).

1944
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A B-26 Marauder crashed, there was one fatality.
An Airspeed Oxford (1912) stalled during a night landing, and then the engine caught fire – aircraft written-off.

1983
Impala Mk 2 light attack aircraft commenced Moonshine Ops phase in the SWA/Angola Theatre of Operations.


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PostPosted: 16 Apr 2019, 10:15 
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Just checked my info. The following happened this week, 78 years ago.

Also on the 11th April, No.1 Squadron SAAF started moving from East Africa to Egypt after the Italian forces in Eritrea were defeated with the fall of Asmara to the Commonwealth forces. On that day, four Hurricanes were flown from Khartoum to Abu Sueir, a RAF base in Egypt, by Captain Ken Driver and three RAF ferry pilots. On the 12th, The CO major Tommy Ross-Theron led Lt's Ernest "Tuppy" Jarvis, John "Jock" White and AJ "Atiie" Botha along the same 7 -hour route. The squadron flew the SAAF's first operational sorties in the desert on the 17th when Lts Burger and Townsend-Smith took off from Amriya, south of Alexandria to patrol over the harbour. They had to land at Abu Kir on the coast when a sand storm blew up while they were airborne.

Adriaan Botha was a 19-year old pilot who had two months to live, by which time he'd become the SAAF's leading scorer against the Luftwaffe with 5 kills in three weeks. He was shot down and killed by an experienced Luftwaffe ace Oberleutnant Karl-Wolfgang Redlich, who at the time was the leader of 1 Staffel of 1 Gruppe of JG 27. A Jagdgeschwader (JG) was the equivalent of a RAF Group, which consisted of 3 or 4 Wings (equivalent to a Gruppe), each of which typically consisted of 3 or 4 Squadrons (almost equivalent to a Staffel, which was usually 12 aircraft, a RAF squadron 16). Redlich was, in SAAF or RAF terms, the squadron commander of 1 Staffel.

On 14 June 1941 1 SAAF's Hurricanes flew patrols over the British army all day, which was massing southwest of Mersa Matruh in preparation for the next morning's attack named Operation Battleaxe, the first British offensive since Germany got involved in North Africa. The last patrol of the day took off at 1910, Lt Botha led Lt's Atholl Webb and Ralph Christie - both newcomers to the squadron - on a patrol over the Sofafi area, about 60 miles from the Libyan border. They were jumped out of the blinding evening sun by two Me 109's flown by Lt Bernd Schneider, himself a newcomer to 1 Staffel of 1/JG27, and the CO Redlich. Ralph Christie was shot down immediately, and Webb landed at base just west of Mersa Matruh at 2035 and reported that he'd lost contact with Botha.

On the 17th No.1 Squadron received news that Lt Botha's aircraft had been found, and he'd been buried on the spot. A grid reference was given. However, when the British grave registration units went looking for him later, they couldn't find the grave and it was recorded as "lost". Attie's name therefore appears on the El Alamein Memorial, with many others who never "returned to base" as they were recorded in War Diaries.

This is where things get interesting. Through a contact at the SAAF Museum I met Attie Botha's youngest brother Phillip, then 81, in 2010. He'd lived a distinguished life, with the artistic streak that runs in the family he had started and ran the Art Department at Johannesburg Technikon, dunno what they call it now......something non-colonial, I suppose. One of his daughters is a concert pianist in Germany today. He told me for almost 70 years not a day went by that he didn't think of his brother, whom he'd idolised as an 11-year old boy. What bothered him the most was not knowing where he was buried.

Well, due to time and travel benefits I have, I started researching the case. After many weeks and months in archives in SA but mostly in Kew, England I determined where Lt Botha had been buried. It was 200 km from where the wartime grid reference put him, due to, I discovered, finger trouble on an old typewriter back then.

On my second expedition to the area in Egypt in June 2014 we searched the area of the grid reference thoroughly - aided by GPS, which of course they didn't have in 1941. I was really scratching my head until it dawned on me to use the local resources. I asked the local Bedouin we had along as a guide - as well as an Egyptian Army 2nd Lootie, for "security" - if he knew of any aircraft wrecks in the vicinity. Oh yes, he says.....2 km south of here, it was only removed in 2004. So we drive there at high speed, as it was getting late in the day and we had to be off the plateau (look at a relief map of the Western Desert, it's a narrow coastal strip with a 100-200m high plateau inland all the way along it) by sundown. One km from the site we ran into an Egyptian army camp. They were doing excercises out there and our 2nd loot watcher, who by this time had caught the spirit of the trip, reluctantly said we couldn't go closer. REALLY disappointed, we had to turn back.

Long story short, I know exactly where Lt AJ Botha of 1 Squadron is buried and will return to the spot when the political situation cools down a bit, to hopefully find his remains and have it moved to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in Sollum where several of his mates lie, including his good friend 21 year old Jock White who outlived him by three days. I hope to also find some bits and pieces of the wreck to confirm its identity. On the first expedition, my friend from SAAF museum picked up a piece of metal near El Alamein which he later identified as a bit off a Wellington bomber, down to serial no. and squadron.

Back to Phillip. When I first met him, he was living with relatives at Hartbeespoort Dam, but soon moved back to the Roodepoort area where he'd lived for decades. When we started talking, it turned out he had lived literally three blocks from my parents' house where I grew up, for 30 years. I'd spent my childhood 500m away and neither of us knew it.

Fate.

Phillip was overwhelmed when I figured out where his brother was actually buried and got extremely emotional when I showed him photos of the area where the grid reference put him, as well as where the grave is. I had to go make tea and leave the old man to relive his loss after 73 years, this time with the knowledge of where his brother was. I wasn't satisfied with the outcome yet but he told me he finally had closure and another expedition wasn't necessary. He died in June 2015 of heart failure. One day when I made my monthly call to his cel - I live overseas - he was in hospital and said he wasn't doing well. I called again two days later but never got a reply again. My dad went to his flat in the old age home, where they told him Phillip had died.

Every clinical statement about "aircraft did not return" and every name on every memorial - Swartkops, El Alamein, Malta, Runnymede - has a story like this attached to it. Sadly, most will never be known. I've done ten years of research into WW2 SAAF history so far and know many relatives and knew a number of old pilots before they died over the last 10 years. When you get to know people like Phillip and others, names and numbers in books become personal and it's hard at times..…….. but it preserves the stories of those brave men. Boys, really.


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PostPosted: 16 Apr 2019, 20:04 
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Good on you Upsun for all the commendable work you and the other people have done to help preserve our SAAF history and bring closure to those who who suffered the losses of family members during the conflict.

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A plan is simply a basis for change.


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PostPosted: 17 Apr 2019, 18:32 
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17 April

1941
The CO of 2 Sqn together with 16 pilots flew to Khartoum on a Flying Boat, to collect the squadron’s Tomahawk aircraft instead of the Mohawks (see March 1941)
The following sorties took place:
1 Squadron. Two Hurricanes conducted a Combat Air Patrol mission.
51 Flight. Two Ju-52’s flew Air Support from Nairobi to Mombasa and Kismayo respectively, returning to Nairobi on completion therefor. A third aircraft flew to Nairobi (night stop).

1942
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Hawker Hart (Trainer) / Serial(s): 2047; 2049 and 2050.
No 44 Air School (Grahamstown) dropped the first bomb on “Dikkop’s Flat Range”.
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Curtiss Tomahawk (AN273) allocated to 4 Squadron was involved in a fatal accident.
A Fairy Battle (948), crashed.

1944
Two Supermarine Spitfire Mk VCs (JL216 and EE856) were involved in separate accidents, respectively allocated to 3 and 4 Squadron. The pilot of EE-596 sustained fatal injuries.

1945
The following aircraft losses were reported:
Two P-51 Mustang Mk IVAs (KM105 and KH620) were involved in fatal accidents, both aircraft were flying with 5 Squadron at the time.
Two Supermarine Spitfire losses were reported too: MH970 an Mk IX: 2 Squadron (damaged by Anti-Aircraft Artillery) and PT962 an Mk IX: 3 Squadron (shot down by hostile ground fire).
A Vickers Warwick Mk V (PN754) spun into the ground during training mission, all nine on-board sustained fatal injuries.

1947
A Ventura (6501), allocated to 60 Squadron, crashed in Khartoum, all 15 on-board were fatally injured.

Once again thanks Upsun for the earlier post, much appreciated. Any supplementary infor on the SAAF history and or events are always welcome =D> :smt023


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PostPosted: 18 Apr 2019, 08:32 
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18 April

1923
A de Havilland DH-9 (123) was written-off following an accident. .

1941
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Hawker Hart (Trainer) / Serial(s): 435
The following sorties took place:
1 Squadron. Four Hurricanes conducted Test Flights and a Combat Air Patrol was flown as well.

1942
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Bristol Blenheim Mk IV (T2243) crashed after an interdiction mission.
An Airspeed Oxford (1966) crashed during the landing at Kimberly.

1944
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (JL-372) crashed during a fighter escort mission.
An Airspeed Oxford (3552) crashed in the vicinity of Queenstown.

1945
22 Squadron’s Ventura aircraft, operating from Gibraltar, participated in Exercise WALLNUT with a Royal Navy Submarine ‘Vampire’, aimed at exercising surfaced submarine attacks.
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Baltimore (FB831) allocated to 15 Squadron was involved in an accident, resulting in four fatalities.
A Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (RK890), 2 Squadron, crashed upon returning to base after a mission – damaged by enemy ground fire.

1974
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Impala Mk II serial 1000.

1977
Aircraft Delivery to SAAF: Impala Mk II serial 1036.


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PostPosted: 19 Apr 2019, 09:14 
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19 April

1932
A de Havilland DH-9 (101) was written-off following an accident.

1940
A De Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth (507), crashed in the area of Rietvlei. The cause was reported to be a ‘Spin at Low Level’. A passenger WO2 IHM Gordon was fatally injured in the accident.

1941
The following sorties took place:
1 Squadron. Hurricanes conducted four Ferry flights, two Test Flights, two Base Defence and Eight Combat Air Patrols.
51 Flight. Three Ju-52’s departed on Air Support missions from Nairobi to the following destinations (each): Unknown, Cairo and Kismayo. The latter aircraft returned to Nairobi.
The following aircraft losses were reported:
Two Hind (117 & 174) aircraft crashed during a mid-air collision. One fatality reported.
A Fairy Battle (924), was shot-down by hostile Anti-Aircraft Artillery fire during combat mission. The crew was taken Prisoner of War.

1943
A core team of 26 Squadron flew from Freetown to their West African operating base at Takoradi, to prepare for the arrival of the remaining elements of the Squadron.
Three Curtiss P-40D Kittyhawk aircraft were lost during operations:
AK630: 2 Squadron, written-off during wheels-up at home base (landing) after being damaged by hostile ground fire.
AL159: 2 Squadron – written-off during landing after mission.
ET1025: 5 Squadron was written-off due to damage sustained during operational mission.

1944
A Harvard (7418) was involved in a fatal accident in the UItkyk area.

1945

The following aircraft losses were reported:
A 28 Squadron C-47 Dakota (KN332) crashed due to bad weather whilst flying in France. Seven fatalities reported.
A Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (NH523), crashed – it belonged to 7 Squadron.
Two Curtiss P-40D Kittyhawk were written-off: FX790/11 Squadron (anti-aircraft fire damage); and 5081, crashed at Waterkloof due to an in-flight engine fire.
A Harvard (7255) was involved in a fatal accident during night flying.
A Ventura (6489) belonging to 29 Squadron crashed during take-off.
A P-51 Mustang Mk IIIB (FB264) crashed after being hit by hostile ground fire. The pilot from 5 Squadron was taken Prisoner of War. Similarly a second aircraft from 5 Squadron (KH713), an Mk IVA was shot down, the pilot was fatally wounded.

1950
Information Note: The first variant of the Vickers Viscount 700 made its maiden flight in the United Kingdom. The Air Force’s aircraft “Casteel” entered service in 1958.

1953
An F-86-F30 Sabre (615 “H”), allocated to 2 Squadron crashed (‘belly’ landing) on returning from an operational mission in Korea.

1964
The last batch of English Electric Canberra aircraft were delivered to the South African Air Force. The aircraft were two T.Mk4 (458 and 459) and a B (I) Mk12 (456).


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PostPosted: 20 Apr 2019, 14:27 
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20 April

1918
J. Bell, a South African serving in the Royal Flying Corps Force, shot-down a German Fokker DR1, whilst flying a Sopwith Camel. This was his 19th confirmed kill.

1941
1 Squadron. Hurricanes flew nine ferry flights and four Combat Air Patrols.
Captains Driver and Pare, both members of 1 Squadron were awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

1942
A 41 Squadron Hartbees (838) suffered engine failure during a cross country flight from Eastleigh to Mombasa, reported damage ‘CAT3’.
The following aircraft losses were reported:
A Bristol Beaufort (754) crashed in the Wingfield area.
A Hartbees (838) was written-off during an accident in Kenya - no further information available.
Two de Havilland Tiger Months (2263 and 2318), crashed during take-off from Klipfontein (Benoni area).
An Airspeed Oxford (3320) was involved in a fatal accident.

1943
An Airspeed Oxford crashed during force landing training, one fatality reported.

1944
A Supermarine Spitfire (EN291) crashed.

1945
A Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX (MJ609) allocated to 7 Squadron, was written-off due to enemy ground fire damage.

1951
A Sikorsky S-51 (A-3) crashed; this was the first helicopter to be written-off in air force service!!

1952
An F-51 Mustang (318), allocated to 2 Squadron crashed whilst conducting a Search and Rescue Combat Air Patrol, in the Cho-do area, the pilot KIA.

1983
It was reported that Operation RHUBYN reached its conclusion in Angola.

2000
The Lightning Laser Designator Pod was selected as the primary Laser Designator Pod for the Gripen.


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PostPosted: 21 Apr 2019, 14:58 
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21 April

1939
Aircraft Deliveries
Hart 1 / Serial(s): 391-393 and 395-396.
Tiger Moth: 2135 and 2136; 2138 to 2143; 2143 to 2162 (appreciated date)

1941
Aircraft Deliveries
Hart ‘Trainer’ (458 and 460) / Hind (189 to 191).
Operations and Statistics
3 Squadron reported the successful shooting-down of an Italian Air Force Ca-133, by a Gladiator aircraft.
Sorties
1 Squadron
Hurricanes flew one ferry flight, two Base Defence and seven Combat Air Patrols.
Accidents and Losses
24 Squadron
A Maryland (1626) crashed due to engine failure in the Sudan.

1942
Accidents and Losses
41 Squadron
A Hartbees (852) was written-off in Kenya, following engine failure, caused by lost coolant after hitting telegraph wires during an Army Cooperation sortie.

1943
Accidents and Losses
Unidentified Squadrons
A Hart I (376), was involved in an accident, apparently caused by engine failure during landing at Swartkop .
Two Airspeed Oxfords were involved in unrelated accidents: 1908 ‘no information available’ and 1935, structural failure in flight, one fatality reported.

1944
Accidents and Losses
12 Squadron
A B26 Marauder (FB431) crashed during take-off.

1945
Accidents and Losses
24 Squadron
The last loss of 24 Squadron in WWII, Marauder III HD481 “S” lost after direct hit over Ficarado fatally wounding Lt Oaks and his crew of five
Unidentified Squadrons
A Bristol Beaufighter (NV617) was written-off en-route back to its home base following a strike mission. .

1952
Accidents and Losses
Unidentified Squadrons
A Supermarine Spitfire Mk IXe (5525) crashed due to engine failure in the Vredenburg area.

1953
Accidents and Losses
2 Squadron
An F-86-F30 Sabre (613 “G”), crashed due to fuel starvation or compressor failure, whilst on an operational mission in Korea.

1954
Accidents and Losses
Unidentified Squadrons
A Harvard Mk IIA (7063) was involved in a fatal accident during low-level flying in the Bethlehem area.

1962
General Information
Chief of Staff forwarded a memorandum, requesting the acquisition of 32 Buccaneers and 6 Canberra B(I)8s.

1966
Accidents and Losses
Unidentified Squadrons
An S-316 Alouette III (65) was written-off during an accident in Windhoek (South West Africa). Five fatalities reported.

1978
General Information
The 22 Squadron Wasp that deployed on 10 February 1978, retuned to base (Ysterplaat).

1992
Sorties
Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team
Operating Impala Mk 1 conducted show number 231 at Franschoek.

2007
Sorties
Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team
Operating PC-7 Mk II conducted show number 513 at Ceres.


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PostPosted: 21 Apr 2019, 15:00 
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Upsun wrote:
Just checked my info. The following happened this week, 78 years ago.

Also on the 11th April, ….

Boys, really.


Upsun: Would you mind if I use this post as an Annex in my monthly 'pdf' version of the diary, please ?


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PostPosted: 22 Apr 2019, 04:00 
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22 April

1941
Sorties
1 Squadron. Hurricanes flew four ferry flights, two Base Defence and six Combat Air Patrols.

1942
General Information
No 44 Air School (Grahamstown) commend training of Course #05.
Accidents and Losses
A Fairy Battle (976) reportedly crashed.
A Master (1448) crashed during landing at Knysna.

1943
Operations and Operational Statistics
1 Squadron. Shot-down six Me-323 and two Me-109 aircraft.
No 7 SAAF Wing. Aircraft from various squadrons shot down a total of 30 Me-323s (includes 1 Sqn’s kills)
Sorties
1 Squadron. 12 Spitfires conducted Top Cover for three Kittyhawk squadrons operating over the Gulf of Tunis. The squadron engaged and shot-down enemy aircraft.
Accidents / Losses
A Curtiss P40D Kittyhawk (AK871) was shot-down; the pilot was taken Prisoner of War.

1954
Accidents and Losses
A Harvard (7701) was involved in a fatal accident.

1973
Aircraft Deliveries
The first MB-326KC (Impala Mk 2) serial 1000 was delivered to the South African Air Force.

1983
Deployment and Allocation Updates
1 and 3 Squadron returned to their home bases in South Africa, following an operational deployment to the Operational Area.

1986
General Information
Reports indicate that the first batch of Mirage 5/Kfir TC-7 aircraft arrived at Atlas (Johannesburg International Airport). These aircraft became Cheetah Bs (serial 858 and 859).

2006
Sorties
The Silver Falcon Aerobatic Team (operating PC-7 Mk II) conducted show number 483 and 484 at the Ermelo Airshow.


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